Why Rider? Webinar | Rider University

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Learn more about why you should take the next step with Rider University and pursue an online undergraduate degree. Meet the CCS team and learn about the resources available.

Transcript

Susan Hammond:

Hello and good evening. My name is Susan Hammond, and I’d like to welcome you to tonight’s webinar. We’re excited that you’re joining us to learn why Rider is a great choice for you to finish your degree. Before we begin, I’d like to go over some housekeeping items. Right now you’re in listen-only mode; therefore you can hear us, but we cannot hear you. If you have any questions, please feel free to click at the Q&A box at the bottom of your window. We’ll respond to the questions posted here at the end of the webinar. But if your questions aren’t answered during this presentation, we will reach out to you directly shortly after the webinar.

Susan Hammond:

So this evening we are going to introduce you to some of the members of the College of Continuing Studies. You’ll often hear us refer to it as CCS. These folks are the ones who are going to support you through your academic journey at Rider University, and then we’re going to share some background about the university itself and the resources that are available to you.

Susan Hammond:

Again, as we go through this webinar and you have questions, please feel free to post them through the Q&A box, and we’ll answer them at the end. So with that, let’s begin.

Susan Hammond:

Again, I’m Susan Hammond and I’m the marketing manager at the College of Continuing Studies, and I’ll be moderating tonight’s event. Joining me this evening and presenting are Arick Pineda and Boris Vilic.

Susan Hammond:

Arick, can you talk a little bit about yourself?

Arick Pineda:

Hello, everyone. My name is Arick Pineda. I will be your student success coach. I have been with Rider University now for about one year and have been a student success coach for about two and a half years. I look forward to working with you all during your academic journey in achieving your goals.

Arick Pineda:

Now to Boris.

Boris Vilic:

Thank you, Arick. It is my pleasure to introduce myself as well as some of my team members who, should you come to Rider, will be integral to your success. My name is Boris Vilic. I’m the dean of the College of Continuing Studies. I have the honor of working alongside my colleagues to help ensure our programs meet the needs of our students.

Boris Vilic:

First out, I would also like to introduce Karen Crowell, the assistant dean of the college. In addition to advising students, Karen is also the school certifying official for all military-connected students. Next I would like to introduce Angela Gonzalez Walker, also an assistant dean. Angela receives all academic issues in the college. Chris Micali is our academic coordinator and he helps ensure that your academic records, including any transfer credits, are accurate or maintained. And Sean Levin is the director in the college as well as Rider’s hockey coach. Since Sean is here with us today, Sean, would you mind telling us a few words about yourself?

Sean Levin:

Thanks, Boris. Yes. I’m Sean Levin, director in the College of Continuing Studies. I’ve been at Rider for 18 years now, first as a student, both undergraduate and graduate, and then moving on to the administration side. Been coaching the ice hockey team here for nine years now. So needless to say, I am a lifer here. I really love being a part of the Rider family and hopefully I can see you soon. Thank you, Boris.

Boris Vilic:

Thank you, Sean. And now that the main reason that prompted many of you to join this webinar today is to learn about Rider, and all of us will be happy at the end of this presentation to answer any questions you may have. But if I can, let me share with you a few facts about the university. Rider was established in 1865 to serve the needs of returning Civil War veterans. A year later Rider founded the evening school to enable working adults to attend classes in the evening. That year we also started admitting women, a fact unheard of at the time, and it was to enable the widows of war veterans to earn an education so they can better provide for their families. This week we celebrated the 100 years of women’s right to vote, but at Rider we also celebrated almost 155 years of educational equality in our classrooms.

Boris Vilic:

While today Rider is a modern, vibrant, comprehensive university, hopefully you can tell that our commitment to working adults is as old as the university itself as is our experience in working with non-traditional students. At Rider we take great pride on being student-centered and what that means is that all of us are here to help you success. For example, our student-to-faculty ratio is 10:1, and the classes will be small enough where you will be able to get the help you need to success. Our faculty are also available to meet with you outside of class time, whether in their office or virtually via Zoom, to offer you help and guidance.

Boris Vilic:

Rider’s also regionally accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. And on a personal note, I have been at Rider for 15 years now and I remember meeting some of our past students in sessions such as this one, and a decade later congratulating them on LinkedIn as they became vice presidents or presidents of companies. Just this week I congratulated two of our alumni. One was just appointed a senior vice president at General Electric for innovation, and another one a vice president of Rodney Strong Vineyards. I look forward to maybe one day congratulating you as well in that capacity. As a Rider student, you will have access to our accomplished alumni through our LinkedIn-like networking portal that’s called Rider Connect, and you’ll probably get to know many of our alumni because they act as guest speakers in class or some of them even mentor our students as well.

Boris Vilic:

Since you’re interested in one of Rider’s online degrees, I do want to emphasize that our online and classroom-based courses are taught by the same faculty. They mirror the same content as well as the expectations. Because of that, the degree you will earn your diploma and your transcript will not indicate whether you completed classes on campus or online. For example, your diploma and transcript will say something like Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or Master of Arts in Athletic Leadership.

Boris Vilic:

We know that many of you are balancing work and family obligations and have competing demands in your time. That’s why our online classes are delivered in asynchronous format. And what that means is that you have some flexibility when it comes to when you complete your course assignments and activities. For some of you that may mean during lunch break at work, for others it may mean after your children go to bed. Again, we know how challenging it can be to be a student, a family member and an employee all at the same time. That said, you will have one-on-one access to our faculty to help you when you need additional help. Also, you will have access to a dedicated undergraduate coordinator, who will get to know you and will help you to navigate Rider’s systems. Likewise, you will have a dedicated financial aide counselor who will be there to help explain all financial aide options. You will know all these people by name and have their contact information.

Boris Vilic:

At Rider we have six start terms for new students. You can start your studies whenever you’re ready. We will accept up to 90 credits from a combination of two-year and four-year institutions, and we’ll help guide you to other advanced placement options such as the club tests or prior learning assessments. Our goal is to help shorten the time that it takes for you to earn your degree.

Boris Vilic:

All of our resources are also available online, much like they’re on campus as well; I’m listing here just some of them. So for example, as a student you’ll have access to remote software, which includes virtual desktop such as Microsoft Office or statistical software, so you won’t need to purchase those. Or My Rider portal where you can access all of your student information, register for classes and you can pay your bill. The academic catalog also lists all program requirements and policies as well as gives you course descriptions. And the Registrar’s website will give you access to the academic calendar so you know when the next term begins or ends. All of these details will be covered in the online orientation that students complete when they first enroll at Rider.

Boris Vilic:

The one thing I would like to single out is our engaged learning transcript, and your success coach will work with you to identify opportunities at Rider that will help you connect what you learn in the classroom to the outside world. And after you graduate from Rider, you will get two transcripts, one will be your academic transcript and the other one your engaged learning transcript. So what is engaged learning? So for some of you, engaged learning may mean taking one of Rider’s study abroad trips or completing an internship if you’re a career changer in need of resume items. It may also mean attending Rider’s signature events such as a division one school, where our athletes are often nationally recognized.

Boris Vilic:

So I can share that it was really special with Jason Thompson, for example, was a student on campus and basketball game days were met with excitement. Jason ended up being the 12th pick of the first round of the NBA draft and for years played for Sacramento Kings. Like many of our alumni, Jason gives back to Rider by working with our students, and you can frequently find him in the basketball practice facility that he funded, and it’s called the Jason Thompson Court. Or another basketball phenomenon is Stella Johnson who just graduated this past May and is now playing in the WNBA for Washington Mystics, and I think yesterday she scored five threes in a row. She lead the NCAA in scoring for most of last season when she was at Rider. If you’re a soccer fan, New York Red Bulls standout Florian Valot recently graduated from Rider.

Boris Vilic:

And much like our athletic programs, Rider has a thriving arts community. Our students regularly debut on Broadway or are affiliated with major performance venues such as the Metropolitan Opera. We also invite special guests to speak to Rider community. Recently we had Kate Hudson and Derek Hough as our guests. And our Rebovich center for New Jersey politics host governors and leading politicians of today. So I always strongly encourage our students to explore out of classroom options at Rider as well, and to attend our events. If you have a family, please, bring them along.

Boris Vilic:

Next, when it comes to the academic support resources that we have available, I would like to note that all of Rider’s services are included in the tuition and there is never an additional fee for using any of them. So if you’re in a class and you’re struggling, for example, Rider has an excellent student academic services center that offers tutoring as well as the writing lab. Tutors will meet you on campus or via Zoom during the week or during the weekend, at a time that’s convenient for you. They’re there to help you with course material and again, there is no charge for using tutoring. Some of our classes also have embedded tutors, when the tutor is in the class with you and has dedicated time to meet with small groups of students outside the class time.

Boris Vilic:

Our librarian is also there to support you. At Rider librarians are faculty and sometimes they even co-teach classes as faculty. So for example, if you’re working on a research paper, you are welcome to schedule a one-on-one meeting with the library faculty who will be there to help you find research in all of Rider’s electronic databases on online journals. At the same time, our help desk is there to help support you with any technical issues.

Boris Vilic:

This brings me to the end of my part, but before I pass the microphone to Arick, I hope that you see that at Rider we’re truly here to support our students. Arick?

Arick Pineda:

Thank you, Boris. As your student success coach, I’ll be working with your closely throughout your time here at Rider University. Every semester we will be touching base multiple times to discuss feedback on the courses you are taking, as well as planning your map to graduation. I will also be going over Rider policies and help guiding you in finding resources that you will be needing here. I’m here for your support five days a week, including one Saturday a month, whether it be email, telephone or text message, so always feel free to reach out to me or schedule an appointment.

Arick Pineda:

As your student success coach, I will be working closely with Chris and Sean with helping you pick the best courses for your time here at Rider University. During registration I will be in contact with you to make sure we navigate potential roadblocks that can arise. During registration, I encourage everyone to register as soon as possible to avoid a course that you may be interested in, in filling up.

Arick Pineda:

And now, from speaking with your current students, some tips that will help you succeed here at Rider University. First, make sure you are checking Canvas regularly. You will need to check it every single day so you can stay up-to-date with information that you will be needing for your courses, as well as checking your emails every day. I cannot stress that enough. Important information will be sent to you daily, so please make sure to check your email every single day.

Arick Pineda:

From speaking with every student here at Rider University, time management is the key to success. Balancing school with work, family, friends, extra curricular activities and just life in general can be so difficult, so balancing your studies is very important. I highly recommend purchasing a planner or calendar to stay on top of things during your time here at Rider. Another tip that I’ve learned from speaking with student is you will want to definitely engage with other students in your courses. Engaging with other students in an online setting can be a great help if you have any questions or need some clarifications with an assignment. Also from engaging with students, group assignments will be easier to do if you have built a rapport with other students.

Arick Pineda:

You will also want to engage with your professors. I believe that having a strong relationship with an online professor is a big advantage because the more you engage with them, the more comfortable you will be if you need to reach out for clarification on something.

Arick Pineda:

And finally, setting up a good location to complete your studies. Especially now with everything going on, a lot of people have their children at home or just more people are cluttered in the house. Please find a certain area in your home, an office or a café to help you best complete your studies. That is going to be a great tip to succeed here at Rider University, especially in the online program.

Arick Pineda:

Now Susan, for the questions.

Susan Hammond:

Yeah. So obviously we’ve provided you all with a wealth of information and already have many questions. We have quite a few of them posted in our Q&A. So the first one that’s come through is are there scholarships available? Boris, would you like to answer that, please?

Boris Vilic:

Absolutely. Thank you, Susan. We do, as I mentioned in my part. Every student is assigned a dedicated financial aide advisor that works with the student to identify all the possible scholarship opportunities, and not just necessarily at Rider. So at Rider, for example, we have had a longstanding partnership with the Charlotte Newcombe Foundation, going back to 1981, where we provide full and partial scholarships for mature women, for example. So female students over the age of 25 with 60 credits completed or more are eligible to apply for this scholarship.

Boris Vilic:

We have other endowed scholarship opportunities, so for example, one of our alumni endowed $2.5 million for students majoring or taking accounting classes. So your financial aide assistant director will work with you to identify those opportunities. We also offer a workshop on identifying external scholarship opportunities, so this may mean your local Optimist Club or the Lion’s Club or program for educational opportunity, and our students have been very successful in applying for those. The workshop that we offer really teaches the students how to really maximize the narrative or the power of the narrative in their essays to be competitive candidates for those scholarships.

Boris Vilic:

We are all aware about the issue of affordability of higher education, and therefore, work with all of our students really to minimize the out-of-pocket costs to them as much as we can.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Boris. That was great. And I’d also like to add to that, that if you would like to see a list of some of the scholarship offerings that we have, you can go to rider.edu/ccsscholarships, and most of the scholarships will be listed there.

Susan Hammond:

Continuing on, we have another question here. How long will it take me to complete my studies? Arick, can you answer that one?

Arick Pineda:

Yes. It will all depend on how many credits you come in, as well as the path that you’re going to be taking with taking your courses. Depends on how many classes you’re taking every particular semester, depending on where you start here at Rider University.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Arick. Sean, do you have anything to add to that?

Sean Levin:

Yeah. One of the things… thanks, Susan. One of the things that’s a tremendous opportunity here at Rider is the transcript review well before you even apply. It is a chance for students to get their transcripts reviewed, not just to one program, but to multiple, and this is a great way for us and the success coaches and the CCS office to gauge where your credits fit, the best route for degree completion and one of the things that Boris touched on earlier, is the opportunity to complete some non-traditional credits, such as CLEP, DSST, NYU foreign language exams and prior learning assessments, or PLA. The PLA is an opportunity for students to earn credit from professional experience.

Sean Levin:

We in the office will evaluate transcripts and provide multiple paths to help for degree completion in a timely manner as well as keeping finances in question. So we like to do a lot of pre-planning in advance because we know a lot of students will ask how long will this program take and how much will it cost? So we know those factors are really important and our ultimate goal is to lay a plan down, almost in the early part of the conversation, so that everything moving forward is clear and concise and we can hopefully find a route both through scholarship and these non-traditional credit means to get your degree that fits your budget in a timely fashion as well. Thank you, Susan.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Sean. Another question is how many classes are taken at once? Arick, can you answer that one for us as well?

Arick Pineda:

Yes. So typically a full term is 12 credits a semester, so usually it could be two and two, depending on how long the classes are. We do offer an A term and a B term here at Rider University, so those are seven week courses long. So it could be anywhere from four typically a semester is typically what students do to be considered full time. Now, you can obviously enroll in more, but that would just depend on the amount of time you can dedicate to those courses in the meantime.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Arick. Another question is do you have combined bachelor’s and master’s degrees? Sean, can you help us out with one?

Sean Levin:

Absolutely. Rider does allow students to get a jump start on their graduate program while they’re in their bachelor’s degree. It might not be the traditional combined bachelor’s and master’s degree, but seniors have the ability to take graduate level classes in their last year. Students in the business curriculum will take some graduate MBA classes or master of accountancy classes. We have business analytics program here that allows for students to take some graduate level classes in their last year. In addition, the master of arts and athletic leadership, there are students who have some goals to work in the athletic field. Administration, potential coaching, recruitment. Those students will take some of these graduate level classes as they’re finishing up their bachelor’s degree, just to give them that first taste of graduate work, get a head start as well on some graduate programs.

Sean Levin:

So we do a lot of forecasting in that junior/senior year in talking about the future, short-term goals and long-term goals professionally and academically and students who have a goal of taking some graduate classes, we work with them to get in some courses that will give them that first taste of graduate work to see if there’s programs that they want to do. In addition, it’s a great opportunity to get a head start and maybe finish your graduate degree a little bit quicker than you thought. Thank you, Susan. Great question.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Sean. Okay. We have another question here. Boris, you briefly talked about the similarities in online and on-campus classes. The question that’s come through is how is learning online different from on-campus classes?

Boris Vilic:

Thank you, Susan. So yes, I touched upon the similarities between the two, meaning it’s the same faculty, the same course content, the same degree of outcomes, the same books used, everything is pretty much the same. Here’s where it’s different. So for most of those students who are taking classes on campus, usually it’s after work and in the evening, so their classes start at 6:30 and they last until 9:30, and it’s a long day. Somebody who has done that in the past, and I teach in the evening, I can really tell that some students are struggling with that.

Boris Vilic:

With the online classes, the way how it works if you have never taken one is that you do have activities that you have to accomplish every week. So there’s usually course reading, a faculty member could record a lecture, a video, but then there’s discussion area where you’re supposed to answer the questions. So an instructor may ask please comment on the use of new technologies in Minority Report, the movie. And you have to provide a substantive answer to that, and what that means is really not give your opinion, but really take the readings from the course, maybe analyze something and provide the answer to the questions.

Boris Vilic:

What ends up happening is when other students start answering questions, then a discussion forms. And much like we would be discussing a particular topic in class, this just happens to be asynchronous discussion. So you may post something on Monday at noon, another classmate of yours may post their answer on Monday at 1:00 p.m., somebody else at 3:00 p.m. So what happens is the faculty member will say okay, this discussion we’ll be discussing this topic this week and this is what you have to do, but you do it on your own time.

Boris Vilic:

The same thing with other course assignments. There are still group projects, you just meet with groups virtually. These days with technology such as Zoom, all of us are used to functioning in that environment. So I would say the main difference between online and face-to-face classroom-based classes is the way how by using smaller chunks of time and chunks of time that work best for you, maybe before going to work, during lunch break, after work, in the evening after the kids go to bed, really it’s when learning is best for you. You’re not tied to specific day of the week and a specific time. So I hope that answers that question.

Susan Hammond:

Certainly does. Thank you, Boris. Arick, we have a question here asking what can I expect in terms of workload and assignments?

Arick Pineda:

Yeah, so typically students, from when I spoke to them, everyone works full time, has kids, family, relationships, extracurricular activities. The sweet spot, I think is 15 to 20 hours of course work per week is typically what students do given the learning curve obviously, but I would 15 to 20 hours of course work per week is the proper amount of time that students will dedicate to their courses here at Rider University.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Arick.

Boris Vilic:

And Susan, can I just add to that too?

Susan Hammond:

Sure.

Boris Vilic:

So when we work with students and we advise them which classes to take, we’re very careful not to put a student into extremely writing-intensive classes at the same time. So we really try to balance students’ schedules to make sure that it’s doable and that it’s manageable, so not to overwhelm anybody. So like I said, the key is to talk to the success coach and to identify and strengthen weaknesses so they can get to know you better and help you create the schedule that works for you.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Boris. That’s a great addition to the answer. As we’ve mentioned earlier, we’ve been working with non-traditional students for a very long time and we understand those busy schedules.

Susan Hammond:

Another question, Boris, I’ll have you answer this one. Where do some of your graduates find employment?

Boris Vilic:

So our graduates find employment in the industry, so for example, if you’re pursuing a nursing degree through Rider, we do have affiliation agreements with 13 health care sectors in the region, and so our graduates generally find employment as nursing managers in those large health care centers.

Boris Vilic:

Depending on the major, we do have a lot of large companies represented. So for example, Education Testing Service is one of our large employers. Waste Management, their management took Rider’s MBA program. Bancroft, which is a leading human service firm in New Jersey, employs Rider graduates. So depending on the student, it could be in any company.

Boris Vilic:

I will say that one of the things that we always emphasize with students is to establish a relationship with our Career Success Center early on. So the career advisors will work with every student, and again, this is all a part of the services included in the tuition, so I strongly encourage students to use it. So your career advisor will help you. They have a variety of tests available that can help you discern what’s the right career for you so that when you leave Rider, you’ll end up with a fulfilling career and not just a job. They will also offer mock interviews where they will record you and will show you and offer suggestions for improvement. They will help you with your resume, and that relationship with your career counselor will last forever. So even our alumni, they can come back, and again, there’s no charge for that. They can come back and work with our career services, especially in times such as this one where there’s a lot of anxiety about unemployment, etc.

Boris Vilic:

The other thing that Rider offers, and we didn’t mention, is we have this concept called Alumni Audit. So any Rider alum, any graduate of the university can come back and sit in on a class and the cost is $40 for the whole semester worth of a class to update their skills. So for example, when I was in college, I was a computer major. That was a while ago, so I could come back and take the data analytics class because it didn’t exist back then. This is really to help or alumni keep up their skills relevance so that they can have meaningful careers.

Susan Hammond:

Thanks, Boris. And as you’re bringing up alumni, that’s our next question. How extensive is your alumni network and how can they help me in my career? So can you continue on with that topic?

Boris Vilic:

Sure I can. So Rider has about 55,000 alumni and if you look at our alumni, a lot of them are really prominent positions. So for example, on our Board of Trustees right now is John Guarino. John just retired as the CEO of Coca-Cola Canada. The chair of the board is Rob Schimek. Rob was the CEO of AIG Europe. On our business board we have Steve Cosgrove, who was the CFO of J&J. One of the buildings on campus, Lynch Adler Hall, was part of a gift that Tom Lynch, who was CEO of Tycorp electronics. Tycorp is a Fortune 500 company. One of the frequent guest speakers on campus is also our alum Howard Stoeckel. Howard was the CEO and president the Wawa. So everybody in Jersey, that makes… I’m sure you know about Wawa.

Boris Vilic:

So when we look at the alumni network, and we mentioned that Rider Connect will look at really to create affinity groups. One of the very active affinity groups on campus is Rider’s Women’s Leadership Council, which is professional women who fundraise to support women students, but also who serve as their mentors. So one of the active members is Pat Hartpence. Pat is the vice president at New Jersey Manufacturers Insurance.

Boris Vilic:

So depending on your level of interest or engagement, you can either engage with our alumni as a student, or like many of our alumni, come back and stay connected to Rider after they leave either by volunteering, being engaged with our clubs or activities, as guest speakers, etc. So that is what we oftentimes hear from our alumni is that their time at Rider was transformational and it feels like home, and it’s always, as you can imagine, difficult just to leave home, so our alumni end up coming back and spending more time, even long after they graduate.

Susan Hammond:

Thank you, Boris. And to add on to that, Boris did mention our LinkedIn-like portal, Rider Connect, and what’s great about that is it really allows people to have a more welcoming environment because they often say, “I want to help students in this major or with this particular interest,” so at Rider University we really do have a robust alumni network. It’s very engaged and very supportive of current students.

Susan Hammond:

And with that, I think we’ve answered… we have one more question. I apologize. Okay. The last question for psychology, I’m guessing that they would love specific examples of alumni is psychology or possible career tracks in psychology. Sean, would you be able to provide any information on that?

Sean Levin:

Absolutely. I have a few student that I’ve worked with who were going toward the psych field and actually ended up working a little bit in the human resources departments of some organizations, really helping with some employee training. Boris mentioned Bancroft. A handful of students that I’m working with now pursuing their psych program have done some internships and some co-ops and some independent studies with Bancroft in the organization there. A good number of students as well as they began to pursue some sort of job employment have also worked to obtain some graduate leave work. Rider has a master of arts in applied psychology with an ABA focus in earning your BCA and working in the autism spectrum field.

Sean Levin:

Also, Rider has a great master of arts in clinical mental health counseling. Rider also has a school counseling track as well. So there’s been some psychology students of mine who continued on in the work force, but also began their graduate level work to make themselves more marketable, but also work towards the field that they’ve been desired for. So Rider has some graduate programs as well. Boris, you might have a few alumni as well that you can think about regarding some psych majors for job employment as well.

Boris Vilic:

I do, but I would like to mention one thing that is perhaps not as widely known. Psychology at Rider or psychology-related majors is one of the largest groups of enrollment at the university. The undergraduate major has about 400 students alone. What that means is that we have a fairly large number of psychology faculty who are leaders in their discipline, but they also represent various sub-disciplines within psychology, and as a student, the way the major is designed, you almost get to customize your major in terms of which sub-branch of psychology you want to pursue and you take classes from those professors.

Boris Vilic:

So for example, I’m looking at the list of our faculty now. We have somebody like Dr. Wendy Heath, who was the invited author by Cambridge University for their handbook on research methods. Dr. Heath is also very active with the Innocence Project and her specialty area is eye witness testimonials and for example, she’ll study questions such as what leads juries and trials to pass a specific judgment. So that’s one aspect of psychology.

Boris Vilic:

Then you have somebody like Dr. Anne Law, who specializes in adolescent and youth psychology. Somebody like Dr. Mack Costello, who his area is psychology of addiction. So actually his lab on campus is quite literally slot machines where he studies as to why people become addicted to slot machines. So going back to because we have such a large major, studies really can customize the area of psychology. With that, then it leads to different job opportunities that may not be available to somebody who just has a generic psychology degree. Like I mentioned Dr. Heath, her work with the Innocence Project, it may mean that somebody ends up pursuing either graduate level work or careers in the criminal justice field as a psychologist.

Boris Vilic:

So I hope that helps answer that question as well.

Susan Hammond:

Yeah, and as an extension to that, another question that came through is how is the masters in applied psychology different from the master in counseling? Boris, I’m going to throw that one at you as well.

Boris Vilic:

Yeah, so there’s actually three different ones and so there’s also school psychology masters program. So the masters in applied psychology really focuses on changing people’s behaviors. So the large number of faculty in that discipline actually work with people who are somewhere in the autism spectrum. So they’re looking to change how a person responds to stimuli, how work is done, etc.

Boris Vilic:

The masters in counseling on the other hand, is what we would consider really talk therapy. So this could be cognitive behavioral training or any number of peer reviews to help people through talk therapy.

Boris Vilic:

School psychology focuses really on testing. So school psychologists would be the ones who are administering, for example, IQ tests. But I would say for anybody, and those three programs unfortunately are currently not available online, but they may be shortly. I would say to spend time and talk to program directors to really learn about the differences and their career options available.

Susan Hammond:

Thank you, Boris. And I believe we’ve answered all the questions. So with that, if you have any questions that may not have been answered this evening in the webinar or as you’re reviewing and considering Rider as an option to complete your degree, you have more questions, feel free to contact us. Our contact information is here. You can call us, you can email us, or you can set an appointment to talk to one of our advisors. We’d be happy to help you.

Susan Hammond:

And just as a reminder, this webinar has been recorded and you’ll receive a copy of it within 24 hours. So thank you for joining us. I hope we’ve provided you with a lot of information, and we really hope that we see you at Rider. Thank you. Have a good evening, everyone.

Boris Vilic:

Yeah, thank you everybody.

Arick Pineda:

Thank you, everybody. Goodbye.