Where Can Your RNBSN Take You? Careers Webinar

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Learn more about why Rider University is a step in the right direction for your future success. In this webinar, we will provide an overview on three different career paths you can take with your RN-BSN degree. You will also learn more about Rider University and how to apply to jump start your future today!

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Hello, everyone. And welcome to the Where Can Your RN-BSN Take You? Webinar. Today we will be going over a little bit about the online bachelor of science in nursing program, as well as the admission requirements and focusing on three career paths that you can take with your RN to BSN.

Speaker 1:

Just before I get started I would like to go over some housekeeping items. Right now you are in listen only mode. Therefore, you can hear us, but we cannot hear you. So please feel free to type your questions in the Q&A box as you think of them. However, we will only be responding to your questions at the end of the webinar. If your questions are not answered during the presentation, I will reach out to you directly after the webinar.

Speaker 1:

For today’s agenda, we will have some introductions. We will be talking a little bit about Rider University, where your RN to BSN can take you, and focusing on a case manager, nurse informaticist, nurse manager, those three. We will then be discussing admission requirements, and finally, a Q&A section.

Speaker 1:

I would like to introduce you to your enrollment team. If you choose to move forward, you will be talking to one of our enrollment team members. So here we have AJ, Valeria, Paul, Cathy, and Noel. Now I would like to introduce you to the program director. Lori?

Lori Prol:

Hi everybody, and thank you for joining us today. My name is Lori Prol, and I’m the program director over the bachelor of science in nursing, the RN to BSN program.

Lori Prol:

I was very excited to join Rider last year because of the RN to BSN online component, as well as the MSN we are developing for the future. My background, my educational background, is I went to Pace University for my BSN. My original masters was actually in parent-child nursing, and then I decided to pursue a postmaster’s certificate as a nurse practitioner. I am still a practicing family nurse practitioner in a retail health setting.

Lori Prol:

I have multiple years in teaching experience throughout associate’s degree programs, bachelor’s, MSN as well as DNP program. I had the opportunity to develop a DNP program in the last university I was teaching at, and I’ve taught didactic courses, clinical, hybrid, and online courses.

Lori Prol:

So I’ve had a lot of really great experiences and roles in education. I’m really, really excited to be at Rider with the RN to BSN program now.

Lori Prol:

So let’s talk a little bit about Rider. So Rider has been well established over 150 years as a learning and educating institution. Rider is certified and accredited by the Middle States Commission of Higher Education. That’s a really important honor to bestow on a university and a learning institution. It shows that’s the way an institution gets graded in the quality and the efficacy of their products.

Lori Prol:

In addition to that, Rider University has offered traditional programs as well as hybrid and an abundance of online programs. They are very dedicated to the quality of online programs. They provide faculty, adjunct, and primary faculty with a teaching and learning center, which serves as a resource to develop these online programs and work on the course delivery and design to make sure that is engaging for our students.

Lori Prol:

You may have had past experiences where PowerPoints are just thrown it up and it’s read this and teach yourself. That is not the case here. They really want to see the students engage with various learning strategies.

Lori Prol:

I will tell you as a faculty member, the overall approach to teaching here is it’s very student centered. So our student and faculty ratios are low. There will be no more than 20 online students to one faculty member, and the primary faculty member will be teaching and evaluating you throughout the course. There are no graduate assistants or teacher assistants. Most of these faculty members are not only qualified in their career area, but they also have a doctorate degree or whatever the highest degree is in their field.

Lori Prol:

Finally, and what we’re so proud of is we just achieved the CCNE accreditation. The program has been around for a little over five years, and we just received our ten year, which is the maximum you can receive, accreditation for our program from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Lori Prol:

So the career outlook for nursing, I’m sure you’re all familiar with the IOM report on the future of nursing that called for that sharp increase effect of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Maybe this is why some of you are joining us today and listening today. That is a huge proponent in the career outlook increasing over the next ten years.

Lori Prol:

Also, BSN graduates can really expand their roles, not just in the general surgical medical hospitals, but in home care systems, in professional, scientific and technical systems, education, and healthcare and social assistance. As we discuss some of the career options that we’ve selected today, this will become clear.

Lori Prol:

So the first path we’re going to talk about is the case manager. The case manager role I love. It is such a unique role because this is really your coordinator. They come in, they manage the entire health care of an individualized patient, and they do this by talking to all of the key stakeholders that are caring for this patient, such as the physicians, the healthcare providers, the nurses, the pharmacists, all the allied health professionals. They manage to coordinate all of their plans of care into a single plan of care with the overall focus of providing quality and effective care all by managing the costs of the treatment.

Lori Prol:

So basically, this case manager keeps the lights on in whatever facility they’re working in. Many case managers do work in hospital roles, but also in home care settings and rehabilitation settings. Courses in our program that helps to prepare you for a case manager would include organizational and healthcare systems and leadership, information management and patient care technologies, healthcare policies, financial regulation, as well as interprofessional collaboration and communication.

Lori Prol:

As this will be a common theme over the careers that we discussed today, there is certification that a case manager would be required to take through the ANA, the American Nurses Credentialing Center. But of course, one of the initial qualifications to serve as your eligibility for any certification exam is a BSN.

Lori Prol:

Nurse informaticist, this one actually excites me the most. I think this is an amazing opportunity due to the high tech act back in 2009, we have all seen a rapid growth of the electronic medical record and the integration of information technology into our everyday practice lives. Then of course, what happens to this technology? We need upgrades to the hardware, to the software. Things become obsolete so quickly. So there is that role of constantly needing to review and implement new systems to meet the patient care needs.

Lori Prol:

So why not, you might say, why not just have information technology do this? This seems like an ideal role. Why do we need a nurse? Well you want to develop an electronic health record or medical record that is user-friendly and effective in that clinical area, you need that clinical expert. You need you. You need the nurse. So that is why this nursing role is really, really taking off.

Lori Prol:

I can tell a personal story from a family member that’s a nurse informaticist, and this individual had 30 years experience in the OR. Now the primary role, which I will say she does from home many days, is maintaining the schedule of the OR and all the areas of the OR, and then turning back and looking at the billing and making sure that anything that’s being billed is in compliance. So very, very exciting role, really serving the institution.

Lori Prol:

A majority, as I mentioned, a majority of people are in the hospital setting, but they may be seen in other areas as well. Median salary, that is not too bad for that role, well over 100,000, and at a very high demand.

Lori Prol:

Courses at Rider that will help you to gain competency in this role is we have an information management patient care technology, the healthcare policy finance regulation, the healthcare systems and our professional value. Again, there is a certificate from the American Nurses Credentialing Center in nursing informatics.

Lori Prol:

The final role we’re going to talk about is the nurse manager or supervisor, and I fully recognize that many of you may already be in this role at some point as a charge nurse or a supervisor on your units. So the primary goal is to maintain optimal functioning of that unit or that department. There are, again, similar to the other roles, there’s certifications in both the nurse nursing executive and the nursing professional develop certifications that would help promote your competency within this role.

Lori Prol:

This role is diverse. It can be an outpatient, inpatient centers as well as home care services.

Lori Prol:

Why choose Rider? Some of this I mentioned, it’s 100 percent online coursework and it’s designed to mirror the in-class experience except the teaching approaches are modified to engage the online learner.

Lori Prol:

It’s in an asynchronous format so you’ll have tons of flexibility in completing your coursework and assignments that works well with your work and family schedule. It’s one-on-one access to your faculty through course messaging, through email, through Zoom meetings. It’s a dedicated undergraduate academic coordinator, so you not only have the faculty member as a career advisor but you also have an academic coordinator to guide you through things like registration, financial aid.

Lori Prol:

There are six start dates, so it’s ready for you whenever you want to start, and you can transfer up to 90 credits from either two- or four-year institutions, as well as prior learning assessments are done so you get credit for your experiences. You can complete this degree in fewer than two years based on the transfer credits and the prior learning assessments that you come in with.

Lori Prol:

So the admission requirements, you would have an associate or diploma in nursing, as well as an unencumbered and current RN license. That license needs to be maintained throughout the program. You would complete Rider’s application with a 50 dollar non-refundable application fee, and you’ll send us all of your transcripts. Even if it’s just one course in one place, we need to see them all and a minimum GPA of a 2.5 or higher from the previous institution.

Lori Prol:

Then we ask you for professional, personal statement on your philosophy of nursing at a baccalaureate level. Really seeking why you want to pursue this baccalaureate degree.

Lori Prol:

So our tuition and financial aid, the tuition is 500 per credit hour. There is a technology fee of 50 dollars per course, as well as the distance learning fee. All of this includes access to student services, tutoring, library access, everything is online to you, as well as that advisor.

Lori Prol:

There is a FAFSA form available. It’s highly recommended you complete that as soon as you’re ready to apply or even before you apply. You can include the code to the school on that so hopefully they can begin that process of reviewing your application and letting you know financially where you stand when you do start the program.

Lori Prol:

We do receive employer tuition reimbursement. We facilitate that process. We recognize that every healthcare institution has different policies as far as employer tuition reimbursement, and we try to abide by whatever you need, whether you need grades sent out right away or perhaps an email will help to facilitate the payment process, we understand and we want to help you comply with whatever your employer requires.

Lori Prol:

There’s also a monthly payment plan, military tuition assistance, and VA benefits, and the Charlotte Newcombe Scholarship is designated exclusively for health professions. That is a scholarship distinctly at Rider University.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much Dr. Prol. That was extremely helpful. I know we have quite a few questions here to answer. So our first one, can you please answer how many classes are taken at once?

Lori Prol:

So as we said, there are six start dates and the six start dates are seven week semesters, fall, spring, and summer. So we offer a class every seven weeks. The recommendation is that you pursue this degree as part time.

Lori Prol:

We developed this program for that working nurse. That nurse that is continuing to work, of course, and maybe even managing their family and their life. We want you to be able to be comfortably learning, comfortably engaging. We do recommend that part-time status. That would be one class every seven weeks, two classes per semester. But what’s unique is you focus on one class at a time.

Lori Prol:

These are condensed classes, so that one class, trust me, we’ll keep you very busy. So yes, that’s the recommendation, two classes every semester and of course we offer summer classes as well.

Speaker 1:

Great. And we have another question here. Are there any required clinical hours?

Lori Prol:

That is a great question. To maintain that CCNE accreditation that we talked about earlier, you do have to demonstrate that every baccalaureate program is providing students with clinical experiences. The really unique clinical experience from an RN to BSN program moving forward from a diploma associates program is that community health or population health course. That is considered one of our clinical courses as well as the capstone course, and there’s a gerontological concepts course.

Lori Prol:

Now, you are not assigned a preceptor or a site. You do not have to find your own preceptor or site. You are just assigned clinical actions, clinical responsibilities, that the faculty member helps you think through and oversee. But these hours and these responsibilities are done on your own time. You schedule, you arrange them. So there is no required number of hours. There are clinical activities, but again, no actual number of hours.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for explaining that. We have another question. What can I expect in terms of workload and assignments?

Lori Prol:

So traditionally you will be in a seven-week course. You’ll have modules that last a week long, and that is how you progress in the course. Every week you will have readings, perhaps some lecture videos, maybe some other types of videos as well as discussion questions on the topics that are being discussed in that module. That usually include one discussion posting and then two replies to your fellow learners. That’s what you can expect every week.

Lori Prol:

Now threaded throughout the course will be larger assignments. They might be written assignments. They might be video presentations on Zoom that you’re doing that help to group together the smaller topics into a multi-topic assignment. Those are usually threaded throughout the program. There’s usually a final larger assignment that really pulls together all the concepts that you learned in the course.

Lori Prol:

The expectation with an online course is that you are logging in about four to five times a week. But some of these logins, when you go in you’ll be there longer, maybe doing your discussion posting or reading replies or watching videos.

Lori Prol:

Other times you’re just maybe logging in to give a check and make sure there are any new emails, any new comments, any new announcements I need to pay attention to. But yeah, we just mostly recommend that you do that to keep engaged so you don’t miss anything throughout the week. Seven-week course moves pretty fast.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. And we have someone else asking how is learning online different from on-campus classes?

Lori Prol:

Oh boy. I find that learning … I completed my PhD online, and I find that learning online, first of all, it’s tremendously convenient because you can pick the time of day, whenever that may be, that you are most ready to learn and to focus and to listen in. You’re not forced to follow a class schedule.

Lori Prol:

It is much more engaging. You’re doing these postings, so you’re out there presenting your opinion where you could sit through an hour class, two hour class being lectured at and never have an opportunity to speak or share your thoughts.

Lori Prol:

What’s great about the online class, particularly the discussions, is you get to present your thoughts on the subject as well as constantly hearing what other people are thinking. Sometimes that engagement with your fellow students and that engagement with the faculty if they respond really help to format your thinking and get you to think outside the box. So I definitely think there’s more opportunity for engagement and for learning in online learning as well as just the convenience of it.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. Thank you. We have another question where do some of your graduates find employment?

Lori Prol:

Several of my graduates are working … Gosh, it’s a very diverse. Several of my graduates have come in with the request that they receive this BSN. They’re already being considered for these advanced roles, some of which we discussed today like the supervisor, the leadership role, the case manager, but they need that baccalaureate degree.

Lori Prol:

Many of them stay in their healthcare systems where they are, but they are seeking new opportunities within those healthcare system. Some of our graduates come in maybe in a role and they just want to do something more. They want to be challenged with more critical thinking skills that move them from the bedside to other areas. Some of them actually just stay in their roles, but they use their advanced education to promote organizational change from the bedside.

Speaker 1:

Great. And before I ask this next question, I just want to say if you have any other further questions, this is the last call for questions. So another question here is what do you look for in a potential applicant?

Lori Prol:

In a potential applicant we do look at the GPA. That that is one component. But I do find that most nursing programs have those GPA expectations and course grade expectations for graduation from either the associate or diploma. So we do look at that.

Lori Prol:

But we find most of our applicants are able to accomplish that, and the statement as to their motivation as to why. Again, it’s a really diverse group in that there are some new nurses that are just starting out in their role that know that they need this BSN to advance forward in their career and they’re starting right out and they want to make sure they’re on the road to get there, as well as nurses that are returning back to school for this opportunity. So we do look at that statement to see what are their motivating factors and what’s going to drive them through this program as well.

Speaker 1:

Thank you. We have another question here. What general education requirements are needed apart from core nursing courses?

Lori Prol:

The general education requirements include liberal arts education, such as there’s arts courses, history courses. There’s a math course that’s required, a science course that’s required. I’m just trying to think what else. Many of these courses are accomplished through transfer … Oh, I’m sorry, social science. I knew I was forgetting an area. Social science would be like sociology or psychology courses.

Lori Prol:

As you see many students that come in with their associate degree already have the math course achieved, already have the science courses achieved, already have the social science courses achieved, in addition to looking at that prior learning experience to see what else can be accomplished from there. There is also just general education requirements. However, many of your nursing courses from your prior degrees can come in and meet those elements.

Lori Prol:

What else was I thinking of … Oh, the math course. We do recommend, however it is not required, but we do highly recommend that your math course if you have not taken one yet, be a course in elementary or beginning statistics. A course at that level will really help you when you get to courses like the scholarship, in other words the research course, the scholarship course, as well as the organizational course in the population health course, because you’d be looking at epidemiological statistics. But it is not required. We just strongly recommend it.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for answering that question. We have one final question here. Our question is, can I apply to this program while I’m finishing an RN?

Lori Prol:

Absolutely you can. So yes, and that’s how several of our learners do apply. They’ll apply in their final semester of their RN program, and what we do is the expectation is that you will obviously sit for your NCLEX and complete your NCLEX within a semester or two semesters. I think we’re extending it out to two semesters now, because I understand that there’s a delay in some scheduling of testing due to COVID.

Lori Prol:

But as you come in there is a contract you sign. You say that you understand that your mission is ultimately that you will comply with completing your NCLEX and getting your RN license in whatever state you’re coming from. It used to be one semester, but we are really working on an individual basis during this time of COVID.

Lori Prol:

Many of my students started out this way. Students I’ve taught a past universities have started out this way. Honestly, you’re in student mode already. It’s a very different learning than you did in your pre-licensure program. It’s more big picture holistic approach versus doing those big care plans and doing tasks and having hours upon hours in clinical.

Lori Prol:

So you might say, “Oh, I need a break,” but it is considered a very different approach to learning. But yes, we’ve had students graduate in May and then begin with us the seven-week session right after that.

Speaker 1:

Great. Thank you for that, and thank you everyone so much for your questions. As we conclude, I want to thank you so much Dr. Prol for taking the time to talk to us today about the online RN to BSN program here at Rider.

Speaker 1:

To everyone in attendance today, I want to let you know that we are currently accepting applications for our upcoming spring semester. So please contact us today. You can reach us by phone at +1 (877) 856-5140. You can reach us by email here on the screen admissions@online.rider.edu, or you can schedule an appointment with Vcita.

Speaker 1:

This webinar will also be sent to you, a copy within 24 hours. So don’t worry if you weren’t able to catch that and write it down right now. It will be sent to you as well.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much, and I hope that everyone enjoys your evening.

Lori Prol:

Thank you.