Organizational Change Webinar | MA in Organizational Leadership

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Learn more about organizational change from Brett Winkelhake, one of the professors from Rider’s MA in Organizational Leadership program.

Transcript

AJ Arroyo:

Hello everybody. My name is AJ, and I am one of the enrollment advisors here at Rider University. Thank you all so much for joining us today for our master’s in art and organizational leadership webinar today. At this time, I would like to take a quick second and introduce our enrollment team. Again myself, my name is AJ Arroyo, followed by Valeria Bernard, Paul Earmes, Cathy Rodriguez and Noel Sepulveda. So we’ll be making up the team that’ll help provide as much information as we can about our programs and help assist you through the application process. Today, I am joined by a special guest, Dr. Brett Winkelhake. Thank you, Brett, for joining us. Would you be able to tell us a little bit more about yourself?

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

Yes, sir. Thank you for the introduction, AJ. Great to be here with everyone. I have been an adjunct faculty member with Rider since the fall of 2018 and my credentials are, I think, okay. I went to the University of Phoenix, finished my doctorate there. I have my MBA from the University of Phoenix as well and I am a recent graduate from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas with my master’s in urban leadership. And I did my undergraduate study at San Diego State University in public administration and city planning. I’ve had the fortunate ability to have had several positions of management leadership, line staff, and that’s what we’re going to be covering today.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

So the classes that I teach here at Rider are LEAD 511, LEAD 512, and LEAD 533. And we’re going to be focusing on LEAD 511 today. The course involves organizational change that covers leadership facilitation in the organization itself. So this class is entitled facilitating culture and process change in organizations, and a prerequisite is LEAD 510, as you can see on the bottom of this slide. This particular class for LEAD 511, we will actually be covering how leaders bring a culture to the organization, or if you bring a new leader into the organization, the shift of culture that they might bring, or how they analyze the culture to make sure that that is the right culture that they’re trying to bring to that particular organization. So, you’re going to have strong leaders. You’re going to have poor leaders. And this class covers a really, really good portion of it.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

When we get into the area of how organizational culture and process change works in these organizations, there are two perspectives that I will cover on this slide right here, and it’s how those processes make up the organization itself and the culture and how it is facilitated constantly throughout the day. Most organizations have people within HR or within different departments that actually go through this information to make sure that those processes are examined and work and they ultimately have the best information that is available to the organization to not only have great productivity, but also job satisfaction, customer satisfaction, the morale at the organization itself. And the second one is a metaphorical force that the culture has that organizes and shapes organization.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

Now if we think about how culture works in everyday society in the United States, in China, Canada, wherever it might be, they all have their way of doing things. And studies have gone about for decades showing that organizations have their own cultures that work within that organization as well. But there have been bad cultures. There’s been good cultures. There’s been right in the middle cultures. And it all comes down to the leaders instilling the culture within the organization and how the staff and the managers and the directors actually abide by it, but how they can actually contribute to it at the same time.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

One of the ways is to make sure that you continuously ask questions, you inquire about how the culture works, why the change will work, what those processes are, how you might be able to assist, or even an idea that you might have that you can bring to your boss or your manager or the higher ups, the executive team at the organization itself to really get a good indication on what the culture is, because we all know we’ve known somebody or we’ve been in the position where we’ve gone to work at an organization that was not at all a good culture to go work for, but you still went into work and you were trying to figure out what is it. Is it me or is it the job? Is it the organization? And a lot of times it’s actually the culture of the organization itself that really can bring down or really improve the organization and the staff competency, the staff satisfaction, the customer satisfaction, all of that information. We will cover that in this specific class.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

So for this specific class, there are several formats of time. I teach the seven week class. Now there’s also a 14 week class as well, but there’s different lengths of time that this course will cover. And it’s really up to you as the student to figure out what timeframe might work better for you. And for this specific class, we cover areas that have four course assignments, which is a cultural assessment. So literally you would go into a organization, could be your own, could be one that you’re doing research on, where you go in and you try to assess what the culture is and find a solution or a medium to discuss what can be addressed during that part of the assignment.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

Now, the process mapping is a group assignment that you’ll actually go through a particular area of the organizational culture, pick one area and then map it out to see where it’s been, where it’s going, how you can change it on the process mapping. And then that will lead us into the gap analysis where you might take that one particular area that you did in the process mapping or another area within the organization that has a problem that needs to be fixed. And when you fix it, you actually detail what it was. So you really start to understand from the leadership standpoint all the way down to the line staff what gaps might be in between those two for the organization to fix it, to make the organization better.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

Then you get into the change critiques, where you look at a particular change that was made. It could have been what you did in the gap analysis. It could be your organization made a change in their culture, but you really look at it and research it, see if it’s worked at other organizations and really dive into what it is that why change happens within these certain areas. Also within the class, we will be doing discussion forums every week. You will have an answer that you’re going to give and you’ll respond to at least two to four students during that particular week of the subject.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

So the last slide that I will cover for this specific class for LEAD 511 is we all know that change is inevitable. It doesn’t necessarily have to be at work. It could be in your personal life. It could be a family member, whatever it might be. Change is inevitable. Every second of every day, there is a change. We’re all getting older and that’s a change. We switch jobs. That’s a change. We move to a new city. That’s a change. Change is inevitable. That is just what it is. And one of the most important things for this class is this class can actually be taught from anybody who’s never been in management or leadership all the way to a top executive, to be able to go through those assignments, the discussion forums, learn the theories and actually apply them to see if they work during the class.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

The hope is that when you take this class and all the classes within this program, you’ll be able to look back, after you graduate within six months, a year, two years, five years, 10 years, that all of this did elevate you as a professional and hopefully from a personal level to understand change, to understand culture, all those items that come along with it. And when you look about the areas that we will look at for the change, it will be the line staff, middle management and executives. There are so many sub areas within those that we’ll go through in the class itself that really enhances your knowledge of organizational change as well.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

Now, the last two bullet points is understand why organizational change is so important. There’s a phrase in business that says, “If you’re not changing, you’re dying.” And I would agree with that not completely, but I would agree with it from the standpoint that if you’re not willing to change, if you’re not understanding why change occurs, why it needs to happen, then a lot of businesses might be dead in the water. They might not understand why the change needs to occur, why their competitors are catching up to where they are or why they’re lagging behind their competitors.

Dr. Brett Winkelhake:

So the last slide, the course allows each student to learn from several different organization’s change. And that is true. There are areas that when you make a change within an organization, that is really, really, really important. There’s also other changes that might be very minor that people don’t notice, but could actually have a snowball or cataclysmic effect for the good or the bad or somewhere in between for that information. And all of you going through this program and going through this specific class, you’ll understand after the class is over what change is about, why change occurs, what culture is, how to change the culture, how to improve the culture, or maybe even take a step back and think, what can I do to help to culture? What can I do to help change? What can I do to improve myself, the organization, through change, through the culture? And I thank you for listening to me on this webinar.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Great stuff, Brett. Thank you so much. So real quick, just going on a quick overview of the program as a whole. Our program here is 100% online, meaning that while all of our resources on campus are available to all of our students, as a 100% online student, there is no campus visit that is required. Our program is also asynchronous. So you do not have to be online at a specific date or time, as long as your work is turned in by the deadlines that are posted in your syllabus and by your professors. If you want to work in the mornings or in the evenings, that’s totally up to you. The way that we’re going to have our semester set up is they’re going to be broken down into two seven-week sessions. So students will take one seven-week course at the first half of the semester, and then a second course for the second half, which also gives you the ability to choose between six start dates that we do offer. This is a 30 credit hour program. So it was designed to be able to be completed in just under two years.

AJ Arroyo:

We also have three concentrations that are available for students to choose from. So developing people and organizations, life and career coaching, and higher education leadership. And right now we don’t require any testing for admission. So you don’t have to worry about any GMATs or GREs.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Thank you so much, Brett. Again, thank you for taking the time today to talk to us about your course, leadership 511, and giving us some more information about our online organizational leadership program here at Rider. To everyone who is watching this, I just want to let you know that we are currently accepting applications for our program now. So please feel free to give us a call. Our number here is (877) 856-5140. You can also email us at admissions@online.rider.edu, or you can also feel free to schedule an appointment with us on our live vcita calendar page. Thank you so much, everybody, and have a great day.