Master of Accountancy Alumni Spotlight Webinar

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Join us as Rider MAcc alumni, Bryn Hoyer, discusses her experience in Rider University’s online Master of Accountancy program. Learn about the resources available that led to her accepting a full-time position at one of the Big Four accounting firms.

Transcript

AJ:

Everybody. Good afternoon. Thank you so much for joining us today. My name is AJ. I’m one of the enrollment advisors here at Rider University and say, if we’re going to be sharing an alumni spotlight with our special guest today, Bryn Hoyer, who graduated from the Master’s of Accountancy Program. Just a few things for today, if you have any questions during our webinar, go ahead and throw them down in the question and answer box. We’re going to have a session at the end be able to address any questions that you guys have and that’s pretty much it. So let’s go ahead and get started. I’d to go ahead and introduce Bryn Hoyer. Bryn go ahead and introduce yourself.

Bryn Hoyer:

Hi everyone. My name is Bryn. I’m a recent graduate of Rider’s Master of Accountancy program. The online edition. I graduated in December of 2020, so still very recent, and I am joining Deloitte this summer and I’m coming on as an associate in their audit and assurance division based out of the Princeton office. So I’m really looking forward to that. And basically any free time I have right now, I am just trying to tackle as much of the CPA exam as I possibly can. And that way I have as much of it done as I can before I start full-time so, trying to get through it.

AJ:

For sure. So real quick, I’d to just kind of give a brief overview of the accounting program as a whole. So the program is 100% online. There’s no requirement to visit campus. As a total of 10 courses in 30 credit hours. So it’s going to get you to that 150 hour mark that you need for your CPA exam. And then we do offer four concentrations, that you can choose from. You can go through a generalist track, but you don’t actually pick a concentration. They are a mix and match some of those electives. Or you could go into the business analytics, finance, or the forensic accounting programs. The program is designed to be able to be completed in less than two years. So for people who are looking for no wait programs, this is definitely going to be for you. And our accounting program has its own separate AAC, excuse me, AACSB accreditation, which is the Association for Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business. So Bryn, tell me a little bit about your time before Rider. What are we getting into? What was your undergrad experience like?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, so I actually ended up doing my undergrad only a few miles away from Rider’s campus at their college in New Jersey. I went to their business school and I did a degree it’s called an Interdisciplinary Business Degree and I really didn’t know what I wanted to do. So I did a little bit of everything. Actually my most favorite classes at the time were my basic level accounting courses. And I just wish I’d figured that out sooner in life, that I really liked that kind of stuff. And then I ended up working outside of graduating at the same place I was. I was actually working at a veterinary hospital and I was on route to go to vet school and do the whole thing. But I ended up really liking the business side. Once I graduated, I kind of took over more of a business role in the company and started doing their accounting.

Bryn Hoyer:

And I just really liked the viewpoint of looking down and seeing how business worked. And I also just decided ultimately that I didn’t want to put myself at such an economical disadvantage by going to vet school and putting myself into hundreds of thousands of dollars debt. But at a certain point, I knew that I grew as much as I could there and even if I switched jobs, I just was desiring more personal growth and knew that I wanted to pursue a career in accounting and that I was going to have to get my graduate degree to do that, to get the 150 hours, to get more experience and just general better knowledge in the field. And even though I was so close to Rider, I didn’t honestly know that they have a online program and I still wanted to make money.

Bryn Hoyer:

I still wanted to work full time and I was really looking for an online program. So I was researching it and low and behold Rider came up as one of the more recognized online programs. And that was at 2018, at this point. I think there rankings online had gotten even better since then for how well known they are with their online program. Even when I was in my undergrad, Rider was always known as a great business school and especially their accounting program itself really stood out. And so I was really happy with the knowledge that I already knew about Rider. And especially once I researched it even more and so how great their online program was. And like you mentioned before that AACSB accreditation is just kind of the stamp of approval on top. And if I was going to spend my money anywhere for a graduate program, I knew that their material had substance behind it. And that was just the cherry on top for me to go ahead and pull the trigger and reach out to an advisor, and get the ball rolling.

AJ:

For sure. And so when did you graduate from the program?

Bryn Hoyer:

December, 2020. But I ended up starting a little prior to that, because I had prerequisites, I had to get out of the way. So I ended up starting those in 2018. And then I was actually in person for some of those and just because I could at the time and some of those classes I had to take in a certain order to finally get to the graduate program. And I’m very grateful that I did those at Rider. That was a great foundation for the master’s program itself. And then once I started the program, Oh man, probably a year and a half ago from my actual graduation, I started my real classes whenever that was. It’s gone by fast.

AJ:

Time just goes by in a blink. So going back to before you even got into the program and started taking those foundation courses, so what was it that made you decide that you wanted to go into that accounting route? Because you were saying that you were thinking about going into veterinary sciences, right?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah.

AJ:

Okay. So what made you want to change course?

Bryn Hoyer:

There was a bunch of different reasons. One, I have friends in both the accounting field and in veterinary science. So I could kind of compare and pick everyone’s brains. As far as the economic advantage of the time value of money to the vet school route, you got to really be dedicated and be okay with putting yourself into hundreds and thousands of dollars of debt. And you’re only starting out at maybe between 60 and $70,000 for all that additional years and years and years of schooling and that much debt, and where even besides that with the accounting route, I really liked the independence that it would give me and all of the unlimited growth potential. If I really want to, down the road, I can work for myself. I don’t have to work under anybody else once I have that experience, especially once I have a CPA.

Bryn Hoyer:

And that was more luring to me than anything else. That whatever I want to do, especially since half the time, I can’t make up my mind on anything. I have that option, I’m not stuck in one thing. If you end up not liking a certain field that you’re in accounting you, can roll somewhere else. And I see that a lot with my friends and the who started doing something, they got a bunch of knowledge, a bunch of experience, the networking, and then they just naturally organically went into a different role at a different company. And you can become a CFO, you can do all sorts of things. So you don’t have to stay in one straight and narrow lane with the accounting degree. And that’s what really sold me on the entire split to accounting in general.

AJ:

So really just having that flexibility and just giving yourself options.

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, for sure.

AJ:

Awesome. So let’s get into your time at Rider. So you mentioned before taking those foundation courses, kind of walk me through that a little bit. I know you said that you took those in-person as opposed to online originally, what was that like?

Bryn Hoyer:

That was a great experience for me to be on campus a little bit. And just experience… I got in right as the construction was going on in the business building for my first summer there, but then I ended up seeing the final results and it’s very impressive by the way. It’s really nice inside, it’s fancy. Yeah. It’s very, very fancy. I really it. But I was very blessed to do those classes at Rider because I originally told my advisor, no worries. I’m going to take care of these classes at a community college. I’ll be back for the masters. And thank God I didn’t do that because that wouldn’t have worked. That would have been a mess. And I know now, but my classes were a great foundation and it was fun in person because I could just swing it for those few semesters.

Bryn Hoyer:

And it was a good experience to have some face-to-face, especially pre COVID times. It was actually kind of nice, because I got out and about without realizing that we’d all be stuck at home for a little bit, so it was worth it. And in general, those classes set up a great foundation for… I mean even the undergrad knowledge that I got from those I had to do my intermediate, the very fun tax classes, I had to do the advanced accounting class, which thank God I had to take that because that is saving me right now in some of the financial things I’m studying in the CPA exam, where it was so drilled into us as students that I’m just refreshing myself on that knowledge.

Bryn Hoyer:

I’m not having to learn it from scratch, which is very nice because I know that’s not the case for a lot of students that I’m in a bunch of different forums online through Reddit and Facebook. They’re like CPA support groups. So you kind of see where everyone’s at with certain things and it’s interesting to see everyone’s experience. And I feel like my experience with my knowledge that I’ve got solely through Rider, has put me up above some of the random people that I see online and their knowledge and what they got out of school and grad school.

AJ:

Definitely. And so with the different concentration options that we do offer, what did you end up concentrating in while you were in the program?

Bryn Hoyer:

I ended up concentrating with business analytics just because that’s such a hot topic right now. And it was really interesting to know and it’s going to be something that the accounting field is going to be using from here on out. So I wanted to give myself a competitive advantage and have that on my resume. I wish I could have taken forensic accounting at the same time, because that’s just seems so cool. I think that would be neat. But I ultimately thought that I should aim myself with something that I would be probably using a little bit more than forensics, at least for myself and what I see my career path being.

Bryn Hoyer:

So I did do the business analytics and we did a whole bunch of SQL coding. We did a little bit of everything, so I have a competitive edge and I’ve already been able to show a little bit of that when I’ve done some internships through Rider, I mean, not Rider, Deloitte and because they are all about that kind of stuff. Any of the Big Four firms are really into the data analytics right now, and already knowing some of what they’re talking about with some of that without having to do any of my own studying at home for that on the side is great. Yeah.

AJ:

Awesome. Yeah, I would say the analytics and forensic accounting are definitely the top two that most students are looking to go into. So I think either one of those are solid. Tell me a little bit about the actual experience in the class. I mean, I know we really work to keep our student to faculty ratios as low as possible, but what was it being in the program, especially in the online version?

Bryn Hoyer:

That was one of the things that I thought was great. It stood out immediately in both in-person and online. Online, I probably had an average of maybe nine to 14 students at the most. And really, it never got above probably 16, if anything. The lowest was seven and so I would say probably around nine or 10 that you were… And these students were people that eventually you ended up seeing time and time again, through different classes. You end up getting to know people that way, way better. And I just do way better in that kind of environment instead of being one fish in the sea. That’s a little overwhelming for me. I’ve never done well that. So that was another thing with Rider that was really attractive.

Bryn Hoyer:

And not only are you networking with fellow students and on a friendship level and just networking in general and on a business level, you’re also doing the same with the faculty where if you’re in the class with 30, 40 plus people, how much time are you going to have to really spend going back and forth with personal questions, issues and not only for questions through the class and what they can help you with the material. The teachers end up telling you their background with things where they’ve worked, what their interests are. And sometimes you can pick their brain on certain things and you can get advice. And I feel like it was just way more personable experience there, than what you’d probably get somewhere else and even online, because I wasn’t really expecting that online.

Bryn Hoyer:

I kind of just had an idea that I was just going to put my head down and get through and I was going to be working on my own. And you never feel alone when you’re doing the degree, even though it’s online. I just think with having that smaller ratio, it just provides a way more personable feel and everyone’s in it together. And you would just have the support of so many people around you. So I did great in that kind of situation. And I was really happy about that.

AJ:

Yeah. A lot of times we see that with online programs, they kind of just – okay, here’s the course in canvas. here’s all the course materials, go figure it out. That’s not at all how we do things. So you still have that sense of community there, even in the online. Now, you’re studying for the CPA exam now, right?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yes.

AJ:

So the program itself doesn’t necessarily deal specifically with the CPA, but how do you feel that going through the programs prepped you in getting ready for that exam?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, I’m very thankful for the program with the CPA exam. Now when you start a class, sometimes the professor will take a feel on who’s going for the CPA, who’s not. No one twists your arm into doing any type of rule. If you’re not going and you have your mind set on what you’re going for a different reason. Then great, that’s fine for them, but they also just feel it out. Sometimes the whole entire class will be set for the CPA and we’ll bring up different topics that are tested heavily while we’re going through material. Sometimes with certain classes, we would use some of the CPA prep material as our real material for the course. So Rider had some sort of connection with Roger CPA study material. So for one or two classes for a week or two, we would study the program online.

Bryn Hoyer:

And not only was that great, because that was very informative, but you also got to do a little test run on those programs because they are pretty expensive. So if you were going to purchase them yourself or anything like that, you already know what one program is. So I thought that was pretty nice because I wasn’t expecting that. I thought that was going to be something that I would have to deal with towards the end. So if you’re going for the CPA, they will answer any questions for you. And any of the material though, is great material to know whether you are going or not.

Bryn Hoyer:

But the teachers will definitely mention when something is really important for you to know for certain things including the governmental stuff, which is just its own kind of weird subject of accounting. So they mentioned the odds and ends of the different types of CPA stuff. And I’m very glad that I had it all saved too throughout all my classes. I saved all my material. So now I’m bringing that up and I’m using Becker through Deloitte. So I’m using Becker and I have all of the material that I have from Rider still, which I use everyday probably.

AJ:

Yeah. So definitely you get a solid foundation to get ready for that exam. So let’s get a little more about your experience, but not necessarily from the class. We really try to provide as much support as we can for our students. What was that like? What were some things that you took advantage of outside of the classroom that you found helped you be successful in the program?

Bryn Hoyer:

So first the accounting department as a whole, it’s your greatest resource? The teachers themselves are all just wizards in the accounting world. They are so good at what they know. It’s amazing. If you look at the background of some of these people, it’s wild what they have done. Not only where they’ve worked, but different research material that they’ve done or, Oh yeah. We were working on this book together no big deal. It’s just really interesting to pick some of these people’s brains. And they have connections everywhere. The advice that they gave me when I first started, I was pretty naive at how everything worked with recruiting and looking for jobs. And I was going to wait towards the middle of my degree to start doing that. And they said, “Oh no, no, you need to do that now. Get out there and do some trial runs, practice.”

Bryn Hoyer:

They got me in gear to do that, which thank God I did, because I really didn’t know that sometimes the process takes longer than… You don’t just sign up for a job. It’s not the way it works. So that was really useful, and basically everyone’s just so supportive. You’re never alone. And even the faculty, my advisor was great through the entire degree. If I was really busy with stuff between work and school, she would remind me that, “Hey, you need to do this at this point, you need to sign up for these classes. Let’s sit down and talk,” which I didn’t have in my undergrad degree. I was kind of if you missed out on the boat, good luck having getting your classes because that’s a pain at that point.

Bryn Hoyer:

She was on it and made sure that I was anywhere I should be. And she was very supportive. I’d have meetings with her at least once every semester. And I never had that before, that much attention given to me for this. And especially, Rider is a smaller school, but there’s still plenty of people. I was very impressed with her and how she really looked after me to make sure that I was doing the most to succeed. And pretty much everyone is looking after you to make sure you’re putting your best foot forward. And another resource that I really liked was the Accounting Society. And that was something that I didn’t think that I was going to join. But that ended up being really useful. I started in person, but they’re doing it virtually now.

Bryn Hoyer:

And you also have a chance to join the Beta Alpha PSI. I did not because I was just busy with school and work, so I didn’t think that that was going to work for me, but you’re highly encouraged to do both. And a lot of those meetings overlap with each, other. So you end up getting meetings with the Big Four firms, the regional firms even corporations like Johnson & Johnson, Merrill Lynch, I think it was, and you can sit down with panels and everything, and it was very, very interesting. And not only are you networking with students, but you’re getting your face in front of some of these partners and the recruiters and everybody. And that on its own, was very good practice for when the time where I was actually sitting down and doing some of these interviews.

Bryn Hoyer:

But it was answering questions that I didn’t even know I had. Like I said before, I was kind of naive with things and that was a really good resource for me. And I still get the emails to this day with the Accounting Society and the accounting department in general. Like they’ll say, “Hey, this person’s going to come at this point in time.” Now everything’s online.

AJ:

Like bring it on.

Bryn Hoyer:

But yeah, so you don’t have an option anyway, and you can sit through a zoom meeting with people and at the end, you can ask any question that you want or they’ll just say as far as job availabilities and different opportunities that you can get for different things, it was amazing how many emails I would get through the week with all sorts of opportunities through the entire semester. It was just crazy that there was that much activity going on.

AJ:

So a lot of stuff going on, especially outside classroom. So there was the Accounting Society and Beta Alpha PSI. So those are two separate organizations on campus.

Bryn Hoyer:

They’re two separate. Yeah. Yeah. And though the Accounting Society is more of a club, but I said, they are different, but some of the meetings, we would include everybody from both organizations to come. A partner or a recruiter would come for the day and having a lot of meeting. So we would do everything together. So if you can’t do both, which if you can, great, that’s awesome and very good on your resume. But if you can’t do both, I would still suggest doing the Accounting Society just for the experience itself. And ultimately I ended up joining the, I think it was Beta Gamma Sigma, or there’s one of them that was like a honor society that I ended up putting on my resume, because I got the opportunity through Rider to do that. So that was an international society for high achievement. So I padded my resume that way, but other than that, the Accounting Society itself provided so many opportunities. So I was very grateful for that.

AJ:

And so we’ve done a webinar previously on our career and development success center. Is that something that you utilize while you were in the program and what was that like?

Bryn Hoyer:

Fairly much so. That was so helpful. I went in thinking that I had just a great resume and I just knew what I was doing. And no, I had no idea what I was doing. My resume was terrible and thank God for the career development and success team because-

AJ:

I think all of our first resume’s are terrible.

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, it was really embarrassing. It was just not good. And everyone set me straight and I ended up not only you have resume templates for if you were a student at Rider, they want your resume to look a certain way. And that was really helpful to line it up like that. You can have personable help, if you want it. You can set appointments. You can do mock interviews with people. You can sit down for career planning or they have a video library where if you just want to watch videos of certain topics, because job hunting and doing that is very awkward at first.

Bryn Hoyer:

Like it’s just so much practice of just faking it till you make it as far as talking to people and so for some of those oddities that I was overthinking personally with sending thank you letters and just the etiquette of everything. There is something that walks you through the whole process which I just kept grabbing in the beginning of when I started at Rider, before I really knew the gist of everything I was on that constantly. And I ended up seeking help through a career advisor as well, just to make sure that my resume was good and that I was on the right track with everything. And then a lot of people might already be familiar with handshake, which is basically a better indeed.

Bryn Hoyer:

And then to put your resume up there, you end up needing, I think, for your resume to be approved. I’m pretty sure that I had to wait and make sure that it was up to par because not only for your own success, but you also are representing Rider and you want to make sure that everything’s at a certain standard. So I was grateful that people were watching my back and making sure that the best version of me was going to be presented to recruiters and everybody that might be looking. So that was a great blessing. A great blessing.

AJ:

Absolutely. So, yeah, I mean like I said, we’ve done a few webinars on career development services, so anybody who’s interested in that, make sure to out check on the website. So, okay. So we’ve talked about your time before Rider and undergrad and everything you’ve done at Rider. So naturally let’s move into… There we go. What are we doing now? So, you’ve moved, on graduated. What are you getting into now?

Bryn Hoyer:

Well now I am just waiting patiently to start at Deloitte. I had opportunities with a bunch of different accounting firms. I ended up just really liking Deloitte and the people that I was working with there. I did the internship last year. And before that, they brought me out to Deloitte University. And I just had a good experience with everybody and I just really clicked. And I’m very excited to be starting there this summer. But I said, no matter what if you know you’re not into the Big Four firms and you’d rather have something smaller. I had opportunities between the regional size, the local firm and everything. I had all sorts of opportunities through them as well. I just ended up really connecting with Deloitte. So I will be starting there in the audit insurance I said prior.

Bryn Hoyer:

And then between now and then they have me connected with Becker, which was really nice. It’s a good resource for students. With a lot of these firms, they’ll pay for all of the CPA study material, which is pretty expensive. So that’s a great resource too, is that they’re helping me get my CPA certification. They’re paying for basically all of the study material and they’re reimbursing me for the CPA fees themselves, which they can rack up pretty costly too. So that’s another good resource for people that if you end up… You don’t have to pay for those alone. You can find firms that will help you with that. So it’s not a burden for you to do solely on your own. And I didn’t know that starting out either that that was going to be a common thing.

AJ:

Oh so that’s something you found out after the fact?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, I didn’t know. That was like a fun fact Deloitte told us, and for most of them are that. Where, when that was something I actually found out in the Accounting Society meetings is they’ll go through the benefits of working for the firms and everything like that. And that was on most of the accounting firms themselves, whether it be regional or Big Four, that they will help you with the costs of all that and the study material.

AJ:

Gotcha. Awesome. Well, at this point, what I’d to do is let’s get to some of the questions. So we’ve gotten a few here since we’ve been chatting. So let’s see. Steve asks how long does it take to complete one class? Or is it the same in-person or is it a shorter? So going back to your experience in the program itself, I mean, what was the length of the class? We went through what all went into it, but what was the length? What was your timeframe like?

Bryn Hoyer:

That’s a good question. Rider has this really neat way of doing it. A semester is I think 12 weeks, I’m pretty sure. And you would do one class for six weeks and that’s all you would be doing. Which is really nice, because it’s a lot, but in the same sense, you’re not juggling two classes for the entire semester. So you’re really able to give your just sole focus. You’re undivided attention onto one class and really get through it. And I was surprised by that when I started and I ended up really liking that way of doing it. And then it kind of broke up the semester too, because sometimes it felt really long in my undergrad when you’re just doing so many classes throughout months and months, and you’re at the halfway point when one class ends and then you start the next one and it was going very quickly. So the six week increment, I really liked.

AJ:

Gotcha. Yeah. And so that’s how we have everything set up spring, summer, fall semester, it’s going to get split in half that. And exactly what you’re saying, basically, we’re not trying to overload students. We recognize a lot of students are working full time and just don’t have the time to dedicate we did in undergrad to take three or four classes at a time. So for sure that’s going to help out a lot of students. Let’s see. Another question here. Did you have to take the pre-reqs for the MACC program, or did you take them in your undergrad? I know that taking these courses in your undergrad can help waive that. And we have other ways that we can talk about that. But you mentioned that you were going to go to another school but you ended up taking the pre-reqs here at Rider. Is that right?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah. Thank goodness.

AJ:

Awesome. So, there are prerequisite courses. You can take them in your undergrad. Work experience can help with that. We offer the courses here. So for more info on the prerequisite specifically of which courses they are, and how you’d be able to take them, that’s something that you would want to with myself or any of the other enrollment advisors, because that’s definitely going to be a case by case basis. Let’s see. Okay. Do you have any advice for potential students in the back program? So what advice would you give to someone who’s looking to get into this program?

Bryn Hoyer:

If you’re looking to get into a program Riders MACC, I would say utilize all your resources for the program. Don’t just try to do it by yourself. That’s not what this is all about. You have so much support between everybody, utilize that. And that just came naturally and organically for me. And that was one of the biggest strong suits I had was just the team behind me, that was just everyone’s your cheerleader. You have so much advice and you have so much guidance. That was one of my biggest resources, was the advice of others and through networking and really use your network. And I know it’s overused terminology sometimes, but that kind of just happens naturally as you’re involved in the school. And that ends up really helping you along with the education that you’re getting as well.

AJ:

Absolutely. So let’s see here. In terms of coursework, what was your average day a week and how many hours a week did you dedicate to your coursework?

Bryn Hoyer:

On average, I would say probably nine hours a week. But the beauty of that and what I really wanted the online program for was the flexibility to change that up. If I had a really busy week, but I had the weekend off, I would get as much done as I could on certain days. And that way, if I had something throughout the week I was free to do so, which was really nice. And of course, there’s weeks where there’s a little bit more going on. Especially eventually you ended up having to coordinate a little bit with group projects and which was not as bad as I thought I was going to have to be with coordinating online virtually. The only thing I learned was that you really have to mention your time zone to people because sometimes you realize someone’s in Texas and you’re just meet you at eight and yeah, no, you have to mention your time zone. But other than that, there was one hiccup one time. But other than that, I think it was probably around nine hours average, I would say.

AJ:

Definitely. Yeah. That whole thing about mentioning time zones. I think that’s something that we’ve all gotten pretty good at over the last year. So trying to work with people, not even across the country, but globally. I mean, we have students all over the place, so yeah, when a professor says “Hey, deadline’s Friday at 11:59, that’s 11:59 Eastern time. So that means if you’re on the West coast, you’ve got to make sure that you’re keeping track of that. So that’s definitely something to keep in mind for students who are looking at program. Let’s see, we have a few questions about the application process here. How long will it take me to hear back about your application with once I apply? The simple answer to that is it kind of depends. So it depends on when you’re applying, what semester you’re applying for, and how quickly you’re able to get all of your supporting documentation.

AJ:

Another question in here, which we’ll address here is, do you need the GMAT to apply? We actually no longer requiring the GMAT or any GMAT scores for your application. So we’ll need your application and we’ll need your transcripts and a copy of your resume. So however long it takes to get all of that together. Plus add on, I would say a couple of weeks to allow it, to get processed by the admissions office and get to a decision. That’s what myself and the recruitment team are here to help with. Just help guide you through all of that by making sure you’re putting your applications together and that we can get that taken care of. Let’s see, this is another good one that I get a lot when I speak with potential students. Is can you transfer credits into the program? Bryn, you didn’t transfer any credit into the program when you came, right?

Bryn Hoyer:

Yeah, I think it was just other than my undergrad studies counted obviously, but then I did my basic accounting courses, which I think counted for something, but I still had to take prerequisites that I fully knew that I needed anyway. So I wasn’t in a position where it was named something else and you have to kind of sit down and figure out if that really applies. I know some people ended up doing that, and I think with one person I knew that was in the program with me. They just wanted to make sure that most of that material was covered in the class that they took prior. So, because if it’s not, then you’re ultimately behind. You’re missing out a puzzle piece there and you’re not going to possibly do as well as if you have that good foundation.

AJ:

Gotcha. And then guys, as far as transfer credit goes, it is possible. Students can transfer in up to six credit hours. So let’s say if you were to have started your MACC at another school but we’re looking to bring some of those credits that you’re already completed in. There’s some specifics that go into that. So again, make sure that you reach out to an advisor for help with specific questions like that. But yes, it is possible to transfer credit into the program. Let’s see. Okay. Can you give a specific example of when you use skills from the MACC in real life work situations? So the age old question. When am I going to use this in real life? So can you think of any time that something that you learned in the program was directly applicable to something that was going on?

Bryn Hoyer:

All the time, all the time. And it really is though. Not only with what I already started with my internship I was able to help the business that… I’m still at the veterinarian hospital for the time being until I transfer over to Deloitte. So even with certain things that they were doing very old school, I could help them with certain even Excel worksheets, because as you’re in the program, I got better naturally through Excel. And some of the things that I learned through some of the classes I could do with that. And there’s also a class that you end up…. I don’t know if it’s required, but I would really highly recommend it. I can’t think of the name of it right now, but Dr. O’Reilly-Allen teaches it and it was the polishing of an accountant. When you’re at, towards the very end, you go through a little bit of public speaking, you go through some advanced Excel worksheet skills, which you could just make a beautiful Excel sheet.

Bryn Hoyer:

It was very impressive. And we did a little of presentation skills and that in its own, you focus a lot on the knowledge behind the CPA, which is very, very important obviously, but this one class goes over everything else, including a lot of the different other things like writing memos, and doing a whole bunch of other things that I don’t think other schools fill you in, but Rider knew through getting feedback from alumni and other people working in the field that having that advantage is great. Where they wish they knew how to write a memo, or they could present in front of people and present like if you’re selling an audit.

Bryn Hoyer:

And that was one of the things that we did was we sat down in front of a partner of a regional firm and he was our client that we were selling it to and we had to sell an audit. And that was some of just those people skills that you end up getting. And you’re getting honest feedback from it. And it was very nice feedback, but it was honest. That on its own is great. I feel like that was very unique to Rider and she taught that class wonderfully. And not only in my personal life, but in the work-life, business world that has already come to my advantage. So I think that class was a big blessing.

AJ:

Awesome. Yeah. I would say the biggest thing is, we’re not necessarily teaching this stuff just for the fun of it. You’re going to be using this in your career. You never know when you’re going to use it at some point. So all right. I’ll open it up just a last minute. See if we have any other questions, kind of a last call and let’s see. Okay. Let’s see, we got one question in here. Could you have gotten to where you are today without MACC? So getting into that internship program with Deloitte and those opportunities, you think this is something you would have been able to do without getting your master’s? Or do you think this is definitely a key point into of getting where you are?

Bryn Hoyer:

No, absolutely not. I couldn’t do it without… There was no way, not only the knowledge I needed, I needed the courses and I knew that coming in, actually Deloitte what’s my number one goal. And I honestly didn’t think it was going to happen so organically that I was going to have that opportunity to with Deloitte. But I ended up having that specifically because of Rider. They put me right in front of Deloitte in front of the recruiters and they’d be like here you go.

Bryn Hoyer:

And it was the only way that that was going to work. So that was great. And the feeling of having a job before I even graduated was an amazing feeling. And I didn’t think that was going to be what happened. And that was just a great feeling when I signed that. And it’s just I’m already set and I’m not even done my classes yet. And I know what I’m going to do. I don’t have the what if behind it. And yeah, that was what I ultimately wanted. And that’s what ended up working out for me. So I have nothing but praises for Rider for that.

AJ:

Yeah. I’m sure given that offer before you even graduate, was like a huge weight off your shoulders. Let’s you just focus on the program. Awesome. Well, I’ll open it up one more last call for any questions that anybody may have. All right. I don’t see anything coming through. If, anybody has any other questions please feel free to reach out to us. The advising team. You can call us at 1 877 856 5140. Or feel free to shoot us an email at admissions@online.rider.edu, or you can schedule an appointment on our live Vcita page to speak with an advisor. Thank you so much, everybody for attending. Bryn, thank you so much for taking the time out of your day to talk to us about the program and your experiences. And yeah, if you guys have any questions, please let us know. All right. Take care guys. Bye.

Bryn Hoyer:

Bye everyone.