Career Development & Success Webinar

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Learn more about why Rider University is a step in the right direction for your future success. In this webinar, we will provide an overview of Rider University’s Career Services resources, where Master of Accounting student Thomas Roberts will speak to the breadth of resources available and how he secured his past jobs.

Transcript

A.J:

Good afternoon everybody. My name is A.J. Welcome to our webinar presentation today on our Career Development and Success. Today, we’re going to be going over a few things. Let me move this over here. All right. So we’re going to go over some introductions, introduce myself and our guest here a little bit. We’re going to talk about Rider University in general, and then we’re really going to dive deep into the details of our Career Services Office, and what they have to offer for students. We’ll also have a Q&A session available at the end of today’s presentation. However, if throughout us talking if you have any questions, there is a Q&A box there for you to use. We will be monitoring that throughout. So go ahead and throw those in there and we’ll get to them as soon as we can. At this point, I’d like to take a second and introduce our guest today. Thomas Roberts, he’s a former and current Rider student and he’s going to be here to talk to us a lot about the career development services. So Thomas, take it away.

Thomas Roberts:

Thank you, A.J. Yes, like he said, my name is Thomas Roberts. I’m currently enrolled in the grad program called the MACC, which is for my Master’s of Accounting. I did graduate this past may with my undergrad, from rider, with a major in accounting and a minor in psychology, as well as in the MACC program I do have a concentration in foreign forensics and I’ll be graduating this coming May. I also accepted a full-time offer to EisnerAmper that’ll be starting this November due to the help of the Career Development Success Center.

A.J:

Awesome. Awesome. So real quick, let’s just dive into some brief history on Rider University. So we were founded back in 1865. What that means for you as prospective students, we have over 150 years of experience in educating tomorrow’s leaders. We do currently have a 10 to one student to faculty ratio, so that’s something that really do try to make sure we keep as low as possible so that you have that personal feel. With 97% of our full-time faculty having a doctoral degree or the highest degree in their field, so not only are you getting that personalized attention, but also we’re making sure you have the quality there. Also as a whole Rider University, we are accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. That’s something that you want to look for as you’re searching for these programs, that regional accreditation, that’s really going to be important for you while you figure out which program is going to be the best fit for you.

A.J:

Some quick facts and figures nine in 10 of our graduates are employed in grad school or volunteering within a year of graduation. That’s huge as far as placement into what do you do after you graduate? Which tends to be a very big question for students. 11 fifth year graduate options, basically, meaning you can add time to your time in school, to be able to extend that into your graduate studies. 311 employers participated in our job fair in 2019 so the amount of exposure that you’re going to get and the ability that you to network with those companies, that’s going to be a really great positive for you. 250 plus of our alumnus are CEOs or company leaders. So we’re not just breeding the next generation of entry level workers, we’re really making sure that we’re striving to get our students prepared for those higher level positions and with 1400 students gaining hands-on experience daily, that’s really… One of the best ways to learn is really getting in there. Thomas, you just said that you graduated and that you’re in the program now, did you go through any of those fifth year options or what did you go through to get into your master’s program right now?

Thomas Roberts:

Yeah. So originally when you apply to Rider, especially in the accounting department, there’s this four plus one which is what you’re talking about that fifth year option and while I did transfer into rider, I still am pretty much pursuing that same path of doing an extra year to get my masters.

A.J:

Got you. Awesome. That’s actually going to be a great segue. I do want to jump into your life before rider. So tell us a little bit about how you got here and then we can jump right into this career and development.

Thomas Roberts:

All right. Thank you. Yes. So I got a pretty unique college experience. I did start at a different college before I came to Rider. However, I transferred in the middle of my freshman year, which is a little unusual for a lot of people. Normally it’s coming into junior year they’ll look to transfer even after freshman year, but so I started at a college called John Jay college of Criminal justice in the city and they didn’t have a lot to offer in terms of career development. I did go to one career fair, but other than that I didn’t really see anything else and Rider was, sadly to say, my second choice and I’m so happy I did transfer here because now I wish it was my first choice to begin with.

Thomas Roberts:

So some Rider resources that I learned about once I got here was something called Handshake. So Handshake is a platform that we use to look for job opportunities. It’s also for planning events on campus and seeing what’s going on, on campus with employers. So it’s a very employer heavy platform and it’s a great tool. I didn’t have that at my other school and when I came here, I saw this and I was like, “Oh, okay, now I can see what’s going on. Who’s coming. When, who do I need to meet with?” I don’t know if anybody knows but LinkedIn is another, it’s like a business sort of platform it’s kind of Facebook, but for the business world. So you make connections with employers also that way you can get jobs through there too, but Handshake is specific to Rider students.

Thomas Roberts:

So that’s where LinkedIn and Handshake kind of differ and LinkedIn is just good to build your network and kind of reach other places. Then I learned about this Google drive. So when you come to rider you get automatically a Google account and you get to share this Google drive that has your resume template, tips for interviewing, a bunch of different things along with different scheduling appointments for your career advisors and stuff like that and lastly, networking. Networking was something you take a class freshman year called Freshmen Foundations and some of you might’ve had it in high school as well, but it’s kind of growing and learning what the school has to offer to you and networking is probably one of the biggest things that are stressed in those classes.

Thomas Roberts:

So continuing on with different things I learned when I got here. So the career services, now this is pretty much exactly what we’re talking about today and some of the things that they offer are one-on-one resume reviews, one-on-one interview prep, faculty advice and feedback along with career fairs and working on your elevator pitches. Now an elevator pitch is something that you’ll work on in that freshman foundation type of class and all the others are signups. So they do have these things called resume blitzes, and it’s just an open event and you can just go and meet with an advisor and they’ll help you work on your resume otherwise you have the one-on-one where it’s just you and one person, there’s no need to wait for other people to be done. You set up your time and you go, and it’s great.

Thomas Roberts:

They do it top to bottom, look at your resume and they help you with feedback on what you need to fix or what you can add and things like that. Same thing with the one-on-one interview prep, it’s something you’ll go to, you’ll practice interview skills, they’ll ask you questions. It’s not something like, “Oh, what do I need to talk about?” It’s like, “All right, we’re starting. How can you explain this experience?” Or “Where have you envisioned leadership?” And things like that. So it’s definitely very, hands-on very one-on-one, which is a great thing to do when you’re first coming to college because no one really knows too much about the college world and the business world.

Thomas Roberts:

So this leads me into my first job. So my first job was with Johnson and Johnson and I learned about it at the career fair and it was a great experience. They actually told me about the job when I went there. So I went back and I applied for it and I ended up getting it. But before I even got that far, I had a bunch of one-on-one interviews, I had resume prep to make sure my resume was good enough for them to look at it and be like, all right, let’s set up an interview for me and it was a great experience because of all that one-on-one time. It really helped me feel comfortable, especially for that first interview, because interviews are very nerve wracking and getting that additional interview prep really helped a lot.

Thomas Roberts:

Moving on to the second job I got, I actually got that on campus in one of my classes from one of my classmates and that’s where my elevator pitch and the networking part came into play. So networking, like I said, is very pushed upon. It’s a very big thing to look into and make sure you can do and it’s networking with anybody, your classmates, for example, for my job, it was with one of my classmates who was a continuing study student and he was the only accountant for a winery and I was helping him out with class and then it started turning into more of a business proposition, right? So he was asking me, “Oh, what are you going to do after the co-op?” Because I had told him the co-op is only six months long and that it’ll end and he was talking to me and I was telling him everything that I did there and he was like, “I think that would be really useful.” And then he had offered me a opportunity to interview with him and from there, I got that second job and that elevator pitch and the interview prep again, came into play massively because without that and knowing how to network, I don’t think I would’ve gotten that second job.

Thomas Roberts:

Moving into my third job, which is what I am in currently and that is my GA position in the Career Development and Success Center. So I do know a lot more now about the career development. Now I can use all the knowledge that I’ve learned beforehand to now help other students. So what I do in my role is I help students learn about job opportunities. I foster employer and employee as well as student relationships. So when a student gets into the employers, they can come and ask us for help if they have any interesting situations going on or need some help getting through it, as well as helping students prepare for those interviews and making them aware of those job opportunities that they might not have known beforehand.

Thomas Roberts:

And lastly, as I mentioned earlier, I just accepted a job with EisnerAmper that starts in November. That’s a full-time job and they’re an accounting firm in New York city. So I’m very excited about that. So this final job was kind of a mashup of everything. I used Handshake, I used my boss in the career development success center that helped me coach through it. I also use the other advisors for interview prep as well as making sure my resume was up to date because I had gone through so many different jobs. You got to make sure you stay on top of your resume as much as possible and make sure you update it as well as updating your Handshake because employers can look at your Handshake account and see what’s on there. So you got to make sure you stay up to date with that as well and all my time in the career development success center, that really helped and especially being a GA, now I can help all the students that are coming in and trying to look for jobs, get their own job.

Thomas Roberts:

So Some tips and pieces of advice for coming to Rider. So I will say, you got to make sure you utilize the career development success center. It doesn’t matter what major you are. We have jobs for everybody and we can help anybody find a job and help you get that job if you do want it, as well as getting that interview help. There’s something called big interview, which is something I learned during this virtual environment, which is completely different for everybody. My interviews with EisnerAmper were actually virtual. So that was a little bit daunting of an experience, but because of the advisors in the CDS, they told me about this record yourself type of interview practice, as well as going with them for the interview practice and so you can watch yourself in the video, the computer will ask you questions, you give your answer, then you can see how you react in the video, which is pretty interesting.

Thomas Roberts:

Another thing is we send out a lot of job emails. Like I said, we are on top of new job opportunities that come out and making sure our students know about them and it’s important to read those job emails. It’s a lot, trust me I know. I know there’s days I’m like, “I don’t want to look this email.” But it’s important to look at these emails that come up because you don’t know what you’re going to find. You might be like, “Oh, it’s another one.” But you could find that one job that you were actually looking for this whole time. So it’s important just to give them a quick read over. Following up with that, the resume templates that are in the Google drive. So when you go to the interview, excuse me, the resume one-on-ones, it’s important to have a rough outline. So that’s why those resume templates are up in those Google drives. So you’re a little prepared, but then they can help you weed out anything that you don’t need and that just flows into getting that feedback on those resumes.

A.J:

Definitely. Awesome. Thank you so much for that. So, as you can see we have a lot of great resources available within the career development services office. At this point what I’d like to do, we’ve got a few questions here in the Q and a box is that students have been asking. So we’ll go through those now, Thomas, I think this’ll be a good one for you. What does interview prep look like? What types of things do they go over in the interview prep sessions?

Thomas Roberts:

Yeah, that’s a great question. So the interview prep is practicing actual questions. So I know the first time I did it I didn’t know what to expect and I was like, “All right, they’re just going to give me some tips.” And it was not that it was okay. So where do you see yourself in five years? It was, what opportunities have you had to make you into the leader you are today? And different interview type questions. So you can kind of practice them, get feedback on them. So I’ll say something and then I’ll be like, “Does that sound right?” And then the advisor would be like, yeah, no, that’s good. Or maybe add this, or don’t say it in like a negative connotation. Like, “Oh, I only had this job last year.” It’s like, “No, I had this job and I learned a lot from it.” So it’s definitely helping you figure out your wording also.

A.J:

Got you. So they’ll help prepare for some of those frequently asked interview questions and help you craft your response. So that way you’re presenting it in the best light possible.

Thomas Roberts:

Exactly.

A.J:

Awesome. Let’s see, we’ve got another question here. What can students expect from job fair? So I know you said that you got your first with Johnson and Johnson through one of the career fairs that we offer here but go into detail. What are those fairs like? Obviously, everything that’s been going on, they’re going to look a little different. What can students expect from those?

Thomas Roberts:

Okay. So, the in-person one, it is in our SRC, which is our gym, and there’s a bunch of tables set out and it’s all the employers, all the employers are at a table. They have different handouts and you go up to them, you’re wearing your business professional your suit, tie and stuff like that. You’ll go up to them, talk to them, see what their job’s about and ask them questions. It’s more of a good conversation piece, but this is where you’re going to give your elevator pitch. You’re going to tell them quick about you because there’s so many students, you’re probably not talking to an employer for any longer than five to 10 minutes. Now in the virtual world, it’s a little bit different and I’ve had a hand in helping setting those up in my role as a GA. So you’ll set up a time or set up a one-on-one and this way it’ll be just you and the employer, almost like you were in person except now it’s just through the camera. But there’s also group sessions for some of the bigger employers. It’s definitely a different experience in the virtual world, but it still is worth it to get there and meet the employers. The biggest thing is just showing them that you’re there.

A.J:

Definitely, definitely. So yeah even in a virtual setting, as you can see we’re still trying to do the best that we can to make sure that we get these resources and just make them as available as we can for our students. Let’s see, we’ve got a question here. What do online classes look like and how are they different from campus programs? I can definitely speak to the fact that the main difference is quite obvious, online and one’s on campus. Other than that we’ve worked very hard to make sure that we’re taking the exact same programs that we offered on campus and just moved them into an online space. So the curriculum itself isn’t going to be any different. It’s the same professors who are teaching the same courses. It’s just instead of driving to campus and going into a lecture hall or into a lab setting, you’re going to be doing everything from your computer.

A.J:

Now, a lot of our online courses and our online programs are what we call asynchronous, meaning there’s no requirement to be online at any one specific day or time. So definitely for students who are working, full-time students who have family responsibilities, we try to make the programs as flexible as possible. So it’s not like you have to be online Tuesday, Thursday, four o’clock every week. As long as your assignments are turned in by their due dates, which your professors stipulate in their syllabus, then you’re good to go. If you work better in the mornings, afternoons, evenings, weekends, weekdays, that’s totally up to you. As long as you get your work done, then it’s all good.

A.J:

Now let’s see. Does rider accept transfer credits? Yes. Just keep in mind that the acceptance of any transfer credits is going to be at the discretion of the registrar’s office. Speaking with an EA , an enrollment advisor, so someone like myself, you’ll get a better idea as far as how your credits will transfer over, but Thomas you were a transfer student. How was that process of moving from one school to another? What was that like for you?

Thomas Roberts:

It was actually pretty seamless. It wasn’t too difficult and in my experience, all my credits transferred, my AP credits. I actually got more credits than I thought I was. So my AP credits from high school transferred over as well as all my classes from my other school and it was only one semester and they did fill in useful slots, but some of them did go into the extracurricular. So I did actually end up getting all my credits.

A.J:

Awesome. Yeah, and the amount of credits will vary depending on the types of institutions that you’ve been to two year, four year, combo of the two, graduate studies, undergraduate studies. So is it possible? Yes, we do accept transfer credits and just for more specific details, I would definitely just get in contact with one of us in the enrollment team and we would be more than happy to work with you individually.

A.J:

Let’s see, I’ll do a last call here for any last minute questions, this has been very good guys. So please feel free to keep throwing them in there. All right. It looks like we’re getting one here real quick. What about a degree from rider? Is that good for Canadian or international students? Do career services help the same way? That’s a good point being so close to the Canadian border and especially online, which really doesn’t recognize any borders. You can take an online program anywhere. Thomas, would you say that the resources through career development services, do you think those would be the same or would that differ in any way for international students?

Thomas Roberts:

So it’s about the same. I know currently, as of before I even got my position, I know last year they’re rolling on with it to help get more international type of jobs and internships, but we do have international internships already available, and it’s the same way they’ll help you, they’ll reach out. There’s a lot of companies that are international. So you normally can find something. I know a lot of students actually that are international and they can get jobs in the U.S and they can get jobs back where they are at home and even in other countries, I know a lot of French exchange students actually and they never had any problem with any of the services.

A.J:

Awesome. So, yeah. So regardless of you’re looking for employment here in the States or abroad those resources and those skills are definitely transferable. I’ll give one, Oh, here we go. Got one. Let’s see, how much does a rider degree costs per year? So the simple answer to that is that for undergraduate programs, the cost is $510 per credit hour and for graduate programs, it’s $970 per credit hour. Now I say, that’s the easy version or the simple version, because it’s all going to depend on the types of transfer credits that you bring in as far as the total cost of the program. So you’re not going to be billed any one flat fee, you’ll be charged based on how many credit hours you take in a given semester and so that’ll depend on how many credit hours you have left. So again, simple answer is, undergrad is $510 per credit hour, and grad is $970 per credit hour and again, to get a better idea of what total costs would be, you’ll just want to work one-on-one with an advisor. So that way we can really get into your specific situation and give you the best possible answer. I’ll go ahead and just throw it out there. One quick last call for any last minute questions.

A.J:

No? Okay, cool. So thank you so much for everybody joining us today. Thank you, Thomas, for taking time out of your day and being able to talk to us about career development services. That’s going to be a great resource for a lot of our students. If you have any questions, any of those specific individual scenarios, or you’re looking for more information about how to enroll in any of our programs, please give us a call. Our number is (877) 856-5140 or feel free to send us an email at admissions@online.rider.edu. Or you can schedule an appointment with one of our enrollment advisors using our live receding link that you see there. Thank you so much, everybody for joining us again, and everybody have a great day.