Where Can Your Bachelor’s in Organizational Psychology Take You? Careers Webinar

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Learn more about why Rider University is a step in the right direction for your future success. In this webinar, we will provide an overview on three different career paths you can take with your Bachelor’s in Organizational Psychology degree. You will also learn more about Rider University and how to apply to jump start your future today!

Transcript

AJ Arroyo:

Hi, good afternoon, everybody. My name is AJ and I’m one of the enrollment advisors here at Rider University. I want to thank you all for joining us today on our discussion with the Bachelor’s Degree in Organizational Psychology and where that can take you. I’m joined today by our very special guest Dr. Thomas O’Connor who’s going to be talking a lot about what the program goes through and what you can expect from the program.

AJ Arroyo:

So just a very quick overview of our agenda today. We’re going to go through some introductions. We’re going to talk about Rider University overall, and we’re going to go over a lot of the details, like I said, about the Organizational Psychology program, as well as the business administration within our Organizational Psychology. We’re going to go over different admissions requirements and then we’ll also have a Q&A session available.

AJ Arroyo:

So you have the Q&A box there. Feel free to throw in any questions. I’ll try to go through and make sure that we get those answered, but we’ll also have time at the end of today to make sure that we get those answered for you. Very quickly I’d like to just take a second to introduce your enrollment team. Myself A.J. Arroya, joined with Valeria Benard, Paul Eames, Cathy Rodriguez, and Noel Sepulveda.

AJ Arroyo:

Now without further ado, I’d like to take a second and introduce our special guest, Dr. O’Connor. Please take it away.

Thomas O’Connor:

Awesome. Thank you so much AJ. I’m excited about being part of this presentation. I’ll take a minute to talk a little bit about myself. I joined Rider full-time in 2019. Prior to that, I had 25 years of corporate experience with Merrill Lynch Bank of America, which is a Bank of America company now and PricewaterhouseCoopers in the management consulting area. So, one of the things I really love about teaching here at Rider is the fact that I can really lean on both my academic background, as well as my corporate experience.

Thomas O’Connor:

And I’m going to hand it back to AJ, who is going to talk a little bit more about Rider.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Thank you very much for that. So just a very quick high-level overview about Rider University. We were founded back in 1865. So definitely plenty of experience in educating the leaders of tomorrow. We do boast a 10 to 1 student to faculty ratio, so for someone who’s looking for some of that more individualized and personalized attention this is going to be a great fit for you. 99% of the faculty, of the full-time faculty do hold a doctorate or the highest degrees in their field. And most importantly I would say is our accreditation. So Rider University is accredited through the Middle States on Higher Education, so for students who are looking for those programs that are regionally accredited we do have that here as well. So why would a student choose Rider University? So first of all, our programs are 100% online, right? Meaning there’s no requirement to come onto campus.

AJ Arroyo:

And on top of that they are asynchronous meaning that there’s no requirement of when you need to be online. So whether that be Tuesday afternoons, Saturday mornings, 2:00 PM, 2:00 AM, whatever fits your schedule. As long as your work is turned in by the deadlines that your professors have assigned, we’re good to go. One-on-one access to your faculty. Like I was saying, you do have that personalized and individualized attention. You’re going to have a dedicated undergraduate academic coordinator who’s going to be with you the entire step of the way. So you’ll have your enrollment advisors that will assist you throughout the application and enrollment process, and then once you get into the program and you start taking your classes you’re going to have a student success coach who’s going to be with you as well. We have plenty of financial aid options that are available for students.

AJ Arroyo:

I know that that’s usually a big concern as far as comparing one program to another. So we definitely have those available. We have six start dates to choose from. So if you’re looking for a program with flexibility not only within the program but when you start, we definitely have that. Students are able to transfer up to 90 credit hours into the undergraduate programs from a combination of two and four year schools. Now just keep in mind that the acceptance of many of these transfer credits is going to be at the discretion of the registrar’s office, so that’s definitely a conversation that you want to have with an enrollment advisor. We can walk through that with you. Students do have the ability to earn college credits through prior learning assessment as well as the possibility of completing your degree in fewer than two years depending on how many credits transfer over. So that’s like I said. Once we get your transcripts in and we start going through the application process, those are conversations that we can have on a one-on-one basis to really plan out what your path is going to look like. So at this point, Dr. O’Connor if you want to kind of go, start going over some of these program details, what they can expect in the Organizational Psychology program.

Thomas O’Connor:

Awesome. Thanks again AJ. Yeah so if you look at, with regard to Organizational Psychology you have two options there. You could go the Bachelor of Arts as for the Bachelor of Science. So though the difference really is the core classes. The classes in the major are the same. The difference is the core. And with the Bachelor of Science that’s also, they’re in the business school as well. So it gives you the AACSB accreditation as well. So the other thing that’s really exciting about Organizational Psychology is the career outlook. You can look at some of the numbers there. You have, they earned an average of $102,000 with a range from $50,000 to $184,000. And the industries that you can work in, specifically one of the things Rider here is located in Central New Jersey.

Thomas O’Connor:

So a lot of our graduates are going into, finance, healthcare and insurance. And they’re really exciting fields. I’ve worked in management consulting. I’ll talk a little bit about that when I get there, but I worked in management consulting and in finance. And so those are exciting careers that are really good opportunities for those with the Organizational Psychology degrees. So let’s talk a little bit about the first one on the slide here, Operations Manager. And in my time at Merrill Lynch and Bank of America the leaders that excelled at operations managers were the ones that really possessed the, a lot of the skills that we highlighted and work with our students in organizational psychology. What I would categorize as sort of the people side of the business. And that’s something that also comes into play with management consulting. And that’s where I got my start in management consulting.

Thomas O’Connor:

And again, focusing on the people side of the business there’s also another great aspect of management consulting. And as you look at some of the, you can look at the fun facts. The median annual salary for the role is $87,000. And an experienced management consultant can make over $100,000. And you can look at the various job titles there. What I think is really awesome about management consulting is if you’re an individual who maybe you’re not 100 – you’re interested in business, but you’re really not 100% certain of the industry. With management consulting you’re doing consulting for many different industries. So one of the things that I, when I was in management consulting, I worked in pharma and finance and I really found what interested me was the finance side.

Thomas O’Connor:

So I spent a significant amount of time in finance. But again, it was really focusing on the people side of the business which really leads us really well into the next area of focus that we’re talking about. And that is Human Resource Manager. The experience I have in HR is more on the training and development side. But on a, sort of a universal categorization of human resources and the role and helping the employee retain power. A huge part of that is training and development. And again, you can look at some of the fun facts there. They talk about not only healthcare, college university, professional school, but also the human resource managers in all different, the other industries that I mentioned as well. Insurance, finance, and pharma.

Thomas O’Connor:

So, and you also have that median annual salary of $68,000. But again, that’s really focusing on the people side of the business. And when we teach our classes we have a lot of case studies that focus on the people side of the business. Leadership, motivation that all fall in the category of Organizational Psychology. I’m getting excited at AJ talking about all these great things. I run in I want to go through a whole section, but we don’t for that today. So I’m going to go ahead and turn it back over to AJ to talk a little bit about the admissions requirements.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Awesome no thank you so much for that. A lot of great information there regarding the Organizational Psychology program. And honestly, I mean, something that we don’t really think about with so many different applications. So no thank you so much. So what I’d like to transition into is really going over what are the admissions requirements, right? That’s, no matter what program we’re going through here at Rider, something we got to talk about is the admissions process. And it all starts with completing your online application with the non-refundable $50 application fee. That is step number one. Actually step number one would be talking to your enrollment advisor, but your real step number one would be filling out your application. And then along with that we’re going to need copies of your official transcripts. We’re looking for a 2.5 GPA or higher from all of your attempted college coursework.

AJ Arroyo:

So if you’ve attempted, if you’ve attended, I’m sorry, multiple schools and universities, you want to make sure that we send it every transcript that you have available to you. Now just keep in mind if anybody’s coming in with less than 30 transfer credits, it is possible that we may need to see a copy of your high school transcript or the copy of your GED whichever one applies to you. But again, that’s a conversation that you can have with your enrollment advisor. Another big part of what students are looking for and lot of questions that we get regarding costs. So the cost of the program is going to be $510 per credit hour. Now that does not include things like your textbooks and university fees. As you can see here tech fees are going to be listed at $50 per course, with distance learning fees being $35 per course.

AJ Arroyo:

And then again, that $510 per credit hour. And the overall cost of the program is going to be dependent on if a student’s coming up with any transfer credit, how many transfer credits. So again, that’s a conversation you can have one-on-one. On the other side of that coin we always like to talk about financial aid opportunities like I mentioned previously. So financial aid is going to be available to students who apply and qualify through the FAFSA application, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. We also accept Employer Tuition Reimbursement. We offer monthly payment plans for students who are paying out of pocket, as well as any type of military tuition and VA benefits that you may be entitled to, as well as the Charlotte Newcombe Scholarship is available to apply for. So that’s something to keep in mind. So what I’d like to do at this point is open up the Q&A session, and let’s take some questions that you guys might have throughout the presentation today.

AJ Arroyo:

So let’s see here. How long does it take to complete an application, and when do we hear back from the committee? So I can take this one. As far as the actual time to complete the application, the application form itself is not very long. Just going to go through some very basic questions. Things like your personal information, your work history, your educational experience. So the form itself is not, it doesn’t take very long. What can take a little bit of time is getting everything that we need together, typically the transcripts. So when you hear us say that we want to get started as early as possible in that process it’s because from the time that you order your transcripts, the time that we receive them here and able to process it, that’s out of everybody’s hands. We’re at the mercy of either the postal service or through email, which electronic would definitely be faster.

AJ Arroyo:

So as far as on a turnaround time, there isn’t one clear answer. It all depends on the semester that you’re applying for and the time of year. So if you are applying in what we consider to be kind of a slower part of the year where we maybe aren’t receiving as many applications, the traffic isn’t as high, you could probably hear back within a week. Maybe 10 days. And then if we’re in a much busier time of the year, typically going into the fall semester, that can, that timeline can be extended. And then of course that also depends on how closely to the semester you’re applying. So the best answer that I can give is get your information and get your application in as soon as possible. So that way you’re not scrambling at the last minute. Now, let’s see what other questions do we have? I think Dr. O’Connor and this would be great for you. Can you explain operations management in the financial services industry? So would you be able to expand a little bit on that?

Thomas O’Connor:

Yeah, there’s a, I’ll give you one example that should hit the high notes. So when someone is, let’s say a brokerage, right? Like a Merrill Lynch. You have, the clients would go into a local branch office wherever that might be, and they would agree to be clients. And that would be sort of the sales side of the business. And the operations would be how that works. The engine that’s driving, the person, transferring in their money, opening up the new accounts and that’s going to happen. There’s going to be different functions that are going to be happening, from a processing standpoint, and then also from a client service. So the systems processing that would be operations manager and also a call center type experience where people might be, certainly some people are going to be doing their transactions online, and that would be the processing side. But then also there are some times where people need some help and they need to talk to somebody. And there, so there would be call centers that still exist. So the operations manager is running the day-to-day operations of the call center seeing systems processing and a lot of project work. Right? Because you’re constantly improving all of those processes. So that gives you an idea of some of the responsibilities that an operations manager can do on the financial services side.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Awesome. Thank you so much for that. Let’s see. What else do we have here? Okay. It looks like we’re getting, oh, okay. This seems like a pretty good one. What can I expect in terms of workload and assignments? So I guess pretty straightforward. What can you expect from taking your classes online in this program?

Thomas O’Connor:

Sure. It certainly varies by class. But I can give you a little general what I, traditionally, I have a midterm and a final. And a that I would, I have an assignment then than a group assignment and probably throughout the semester I would have a weekly discussion on the discussion board. Basically referring most of the time to the readings for that particular week. So that would be, I hope that answers the question. That’s basically how I would look at it. I’m viewing it in terms of midterm, final, written assignment, and then a final group assignment along with those weekly discussions that you’ve just put a chime in to the weekly discussion on the subject that we’re talking about that week.

AJ Arroyo:

Gotcha. Gotcha. So this kind of leads into another question that I just got in the chat box. How would you say online learning differs from campus learning? I know that we try to make sure that we have the same information being presented. But realistically, how does that, how do they differ and how would you say that they might be the same?

Thomas O’Connor:

Yeah, I think that’s a great question. And that’s a one in which I love talking about because you’re covering the same material. But how they would vary it depends. I’ll just, I’ll say the, you’re usually having, in the classroom you’re having an in-person lecture and Q&A, right? So you sort of have that lecture and you might have a case study discussion where people are talking about it in real time. In the online environment that discussion is going to take place in, on a discussion board. So that’s one difference and you can be creative as well instead of sort of, you can sort of bridge the two. On that discussion board I could give the option of video uploads. So that sort of gets it closer to being there. So, but that’s the main area. The discussion would be – in the classroom the discussion would be in person. Online the discussion is on that discussion board and it can be through text or video.

AJ Arroyo:

Gotcha. Gotcha. So it’s not so much that the information is changing, but I mean kind of the answer baked right into the question.

Thomas O’Connor:

Right.

AJ Arroyo:

In the classroom, you’d have those personal interactions. Whereas when you’re doing the online program, you still try to have those interactions but it’s going to be through those discussion boards. Not necessarily an in person discussion. Gotcha. Awesome.

Thomas O’Connor:

The way to sum it up is basically saying the goals that are set are the same, the goals that achieved are the same. How you achieve them is what will differ.

AJ Arroyo:

Okay. Gotcha. So we’ve got two questions actually here that kind of popped in at the same time. So we’ll kind of ask it in a two part. Where do the majority of recent college grads get hired in human resources? And then a second question, I guess we can tag along into that is, what do you see as most likely the, I guess the most entry level career in HR that somebody graduating from this program would step into?

Thomas O’Connor:

That’s a great question. And I’ve been involved with some HR professional associations. I would say a lot of times that first entry-level position in HR is into the recruiting side. That’s, it’s not always the case, but it does seem like there’s a lot of opportunities. So what individuals will do is they’ll get into the recruiting side of it. And then that’s, and that the other part is you have to think about the larger companies. The larger companies, larger corporations. Here up and down the corridor in Central New Jersey you have a lot of large corporations, so it’s recruiting. But then once you’re in recruiting you can then move to all the different areas within HR. It’s not exclusively HR there, I mean it’s not exclusively recruiting but I do see it a lot.

AJ Arroyo:

Gotcha. Awesome. And so we got one question coming in here, which I kind of like. I feel like this is something that we can expand a little bit on but what would you say is the biggest value of a degree program like this?

Thomas O’Connor:

For me it’s what I sort of mentioned in the discussion. That’s kind of like the, this sort of the three careers paths that I mentioned. It’s focusing on the people side of business, right? When you’re talking about Organizational Psychology it’s focusing on the people side of the business, right? The idea of you want people to be, you want to, you want people to be success, you want people to join your organization and be successful and make the organization successful. So how do you do that? You can’t just focus on the product. You have to focus on your people as well, right? And that’s what Organizational Psychology does. The idea of motivating people, engaging people. And that’s what I think makes it so exciting. That in my opinion, that is the biggest value.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Awesome. And so I guess kind of going along these lines of thinking very high level, what do you think is the future of the training function within a corporation?

Thomas O’Connor:

Wow that’s, that’s such a question AJ. And we could go on all afternoon with that one right? Because it’s -.

AJ Arroyo:

We might need a whole other presentation just for that one.

Thomas O’Connor:

I know. Yeah I, set one up. Set one up. We’ll do it. But I’ll take a starting discussion of it. It’s what you, you really had happen was, and I, my dissertation was on web based learning in 2005. And that idea of corporations focusing on training and development and sort of embracing the new technologies that are out there and you do see that right? The learning management systems and the growth of online education within corporations is certainly growing. And then all of a sudden you had COVID-19, right? And the world changed. And what was the most important thing to do? Communicate through technology, right? So the I, what’s happening, right?

Thomas O’Connor:

People are getting used to communicating through technology. So then that has a downstream effect on training and development, right? Whereas in the past people were like, “Ah, I like being in person.” And so on. So yes you do, but then what’s happening people are realizing that you can successfully communicate and successfully participate in training and development programs online. So now this is having a huge impact on corporations, so that whole, and that training and development, learning and education, whatever your, whatever corporations call it, it falls under HR. It falls under Human Resources. So this is having a big impact. I’m a member of the Society of Human Resource Management Association for Talent Development, which are national professional associations. And it’s just the research and the amount of data being produced on this is through the roof. So I’m really excited to be in the middle of it here at Rider.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. Awesome. Yeah I think that’s something that we could definitely have a much longer discussion if we have the time for that. So I think that’s great. So what I’d like to do is open this up real quick. One last call for any last minute questions. It looks like I see someone typing in here. Oh, okay. This is a little easier one. How many classes are taken at once? I can speak to this a little bit. So again, our program is designed to be flexible. We understand that students are not only just taking, going through classes and going through the program. We understand you have families, you have work. There are other things that you’re going to be taking, so the way that we have it set up for our online courses is you’re going to be taking seven week courses at a time.

AJ Arroyo:

So there’s two seven week periods that make up one semester. And at the undergraduate level within that online students can typically take one to two courses in a seven week period, totaling anywhere from two to four courses in a semester. Now again, our program is designed to be very flexible, to be very accommodating. So if you think you can handle more great that’s a conversation that you can have with your professors and with your student success coach. If you need to maybe tone it down a little bit and maybe not take as many courses one semester as you get in another, that’s also a very real possibility. But I would say on average, you’re probably looking at around 12 credit hours per semester that you’re going to be taking. So, but again, that varies from each individual student. So, okay. One quick last call to see if we have any other questions. I’ll give you guys a quick five seconds.

AJ Arroyo:

Awesome. All right. Well everybody thank you so much for joining us today. Tom, thank you so much for taking time out and really going over the Organizational Psychology program and really how that fits into corporations today and how students can really think about it. To everyone in attendance today again, thank you so much. We are currently accepting applications. So please give us a call. Our number here is (877)856-5140. You can also email us at admissions@online.rider.edu, or you can schedule an appointment with one of our enrollment advisors using our live vcita link. Again thank you so much to everybody and everybody have a great day.

Thomas O’Connor:

Awesome. Thank you.